19/3/20: Now Thailand – ILLEGAL ‘wet animal markets’ where it’s believed the Coronavirus originated are still operating under organised crime gangs.

Thai

 

 60 Minutes exposed the continuing animal trade in Thailand's Chatuchak wildlife market in Bangkok

 Wild animals smuggled from across the world sat in cages for their live or slaughtered sale

Thailand – Bangkok – Illegal wet markets are still selling live animals, despite the Coronavirus infections across the world.

ILLEGAL ‘wet animal markets’ where it’s believed the Coronavirus originated are still operating under organised crime gangs.

The shocking discovery was revealed in an undercover investigation by 60 Minutes Australia journalist Liam Bartlett.

 

watch the video

 

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/11126895/coronavirus-illegal-wet-markets-still-selling-live-animals/

 

Watch the undercover video of the market via the above link.

 

 

‘TIME BOMB’

Coronavirus: Illegal ‘wet markets’ are STILL selling live animals in Bangkok despite ban over fears of new epidemics

Confronting footage shows cage after cage of wild “high risk” animals being stored for their slaughter and sale in wet markets, despite Asian governments claiming they had been shut down following the COVID-19 outbreak.

Travelling to Thailand, Bartlett was joined by leading environmental and human rights investigator Steven Galster, at who warned the wet market has the potential to spark a “second Wuhan.”

A strict ban on the consumption and farming of wild animals was rolled out across China in a desperate effort to contain the coronavirus, which is believed to have started at a wildlife market in Wuhan.

 

 African serval cats, fennec foxes from the Sahara and marmosets from South America were discovered in the market

 

Although it is unclear which animal transferred the virus to humans, China acknowledged it needed to bring its lucrative wildlife industry under control to prevent another outbreak.

China closed over 20,000 wet markets in February, but markets being run by crime syndicates are still selling off animals across Asia with impunity.

The hotbeds for disease are still operating in Thailand, Indonesia, Laos, Cambodia and Burma, where millions of dollars are being made in the shipping and trading of “exotic meat” and wildlife.

At the Chatuchak market in the heart of Bangkok, wild animals smuggled from across the world sat in cages for their live or slaughtered sale.

Covert footage showed African serval cats, fennec foxes from the Sahara, marmosets from South America, blue-tongued lizards, iguanas, monkeys, Australian cockatoos, African meerkats, ferrets, rare tortoises, porcupines, snakes and skunks, among others.

The animals sold in wet markets are highly vulnerable to catching and passing on viruses, due to their diminished immune systems caused by the stress of living in the squalid conditions.

This adds to the risk of viruses such as COVID-19 crossing over to humans during the animals’ handling process and slaughter.

While experts aren’t yet certain, there is suspicion is that coronavirus crossed over to humans late last year from the pangolin, the most trafficked wild animal in the world popular in the unhygienic street sales.

The wet markets are visited by thousands of people each day, making the risk of the virus jumping to humans even higher.

Mr Galster told the Australian media outlet Asia’s wet markets are a “sleeping time bomb” of coronavirus risk.

 

One thought on “19/3/20: Now Thailand – ILLEGAL ‘wet animal markets’ where it’s believed the Coronavirus originated are still operating under organised crime gangs.”

  1. My only wish is that all human beings who eat, animals and all who use and torture animals in any way: become extinct in humanity.

    Like

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