Sudan: 2 Days Prior To ‘Live Export International Awareness Day’ (Today); Livestock Vessel Sinks in Sudanese Port. Over 15,000 Sheep Drown. Links Given.

Added 1650GMT – https://splash247.com/15000-sheep-perish-as-overloaded-sudanese-livestock-carrier-capsizes/

The loss of the Al Badri 1 may affect the port’s operations, as well as the environment, given the potential for a fuel oil spill and the effluent from the decay of thousands of sheep. The vessel is now submerged next to its berth, interfering with the pier’s use until the wreck is cleared’. 

‘Originally built in 1973 and converted into a livestock carrier later in her lifespan. She had a history of port state control deficiencies in recent years, as well as a 10-year gap from 2008-18 in which she had no PSC inspections. 

Images from before and after the Al Badri 1’s conversion suggest that four extra decks were welded on above the ship’s main deck level to add more space for livestock. 

Worldwide, livestock carriers are generally older than the average merchant ship, and the average fleet age for the class exceeds 40 years’

Maritime Executive

https://www.maritime-executive.com/article/photos-livestock-carrier-capsizes-and-sinks-killing-15-000-sheep

A similar incident occurred aboard the livestock carrier Queen Hind in November 2019. The vessel capsized off the coast of Romania under unusual circumstances, drowning almost all of the 15,000 sheep on board. 

Is that always the first thing you hear ? – the monetary value that has been lost due to the incident; never mind the thousands of sentient beings who have died in the worst way for the want of humans wanting a few pennies more.

We also understand that the vessel was officially only allowed to carry 9,000 animals; yet 15,800+ drowned. Thus it would appear as we always suspect with these cheap rate bathtubs which are used in this business, the vessel was carrying twice as many animals as it should have been; which we expect (are very certain of) being the cause of the incident in the first place.

Due to the number of animal deaths, it appears that the port will now suffer a major environmental impact. Great, lets hope it is a very major environmental impact.

14/6/22 – Today, Tuesday, is Ban Live Exports: International Awareness Day,

Today is the day.

On Sunday (12/6/22) we all had the disgusting news that more than 15,000 sheep had drowned in the Sudanese port of Suakin when a livestock carrying vessel – the Badr 1, sank in the Red Sea port.  We understand that the sheep were being exported to Saudi Arabia. This incident has prompted main environmental concerns for the port area.

Here I am giving several links from around the world relating to this incident.

And this, just 2 days before the ban live exports international awareness day – yet another nail in the coffin for the live trade; we only hope that the port suffers a massive loss of business due to this and its involvement with a disgusting business. 

Regards Mark

More than 15,000 sheep drown after live export ship sinks in Sudan | Sudan | The Guardian

15,000 sheep drown in freak accident as live export ship sinks in Sudan | news.com.au — Australia’s leading news site

15,000 sheep drown in the Red Sea after ship crammed with livestock sinks in Sudan port  | Daily Mail Online

Red Sea port of Suakin: Sudan Ship With Thousands Of Sheep Sinks (ndtv.com)

badr 1 sank in red sea port of suakin – Bing images

Livestock Vessel Sinks in Red Sea, Drowning More Than 15,000 Sheep – EcoWatch

Sudan: Over 15,000 sheep drown in Suakin port | Middle East Eye

Thousands of sheep drown as Sudan ship sinks (gulf-times.com)

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