Category: Fur and Fur Farming

Thank`s Lacoste!

 

_Lacoste-1

 

We are excited to partner with Lacoste and announce its commitment to a fur-free policy. The brand’s Global CSR manager said: “Lacoste has decided to ban fur long ago. However, we felt it was important to add our name to the list of fur-free companies to show our support for the cause around the globe.”
#LacosteFurFree

And we mean: For all who say that there is no hope for the abolition of the Fur Farms – we disagree!!!

We will continue to fight for it, and we will fight harder than ever. After all, the animals only have us. Together, we will push the fur industry and its deadly machinery even further offside!

Best regards to all, Venus

Ireland: Strong Rumours It Will Ban Fur Farming – Joining Lots of Other EU Nations.

Ireland

 

https://www.irishexaminer.com/breakingnews/ireland/fur-farming-is-to-be-banned-in-ireland-932571.html

 

Fur farming is to be banned in Ireland, the Irish Examiner can reveal.

Agriculture Minister Michael Creed is to bring a proposal to Government this week to phase out fur farms.

The Government has been under increasing pressure to follow the lead of 14 other EU countries, which have already banned fur farms.

However, the move is a dramatic shift in Government policy.

Solidarity-PBP TD Ruth Coppinger, a long-time anti-fur campaigner, had already received support from across opposition, including from Fianna Fáil, Sinn Féin, Labour, Independents 4 Change, the Green Party, and the Social Democrats, for her Prohibition of Fur Farming Bill. It is due back before the Dáil on July 3.

However, it is understood that the Government will now move on the matter.

Mr Creed is to seek approval for the drafting of legislation that would unwind the fur sector in this country in a legally robust manner.

Ending fur farming is thought to have been under consideration by the minister for some time. However, concerns around the constitutionality of such a ban, and the rights of those employed on fur farms, had delayed progress.

Around 100 people are employed in the fur industry and these jobs are in Donegal, Kerry, and Offaly.

Earlier this year, Údarás na Gaeltachta was criticised when it emerged that two Donegal-based fur farms, once of which has since stopped operating, had received over €200,000 in State funding since 2009.

The Government had already raised concerns about Ms Coppinger’s bill, claiming it is legally flawed and could expose the State to significant legal liability.

It is understood that they will now draft their own legislation, instead of adopting the Solidarity-PBP bill.

A ban on fur farming would be a policy U-turn for the Government, which, in defending the industry, have often cited the employment impact on remote and rural areas.

In February of this year, Mr Creed told the Dáil:

 

fur is dead

 

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/ireland-fur-farm-ban-mink-farming-jobs-ispca-animal-welfare-a8972546.html

 

https://allthatsinteresting.com/fur-farming-ban-ireland

 

Inhumane Fur Farming Set To Be Outlawed In Ireland

“It is impossible to regulate the fur trade and somehow make it kinder. It is not farming at all. The mink are gassed at six months and their skins are pulled off.”

Fur farming is common practice in all corners of the world. The confinement of animals to tiny cages, only to gas them to death for their fur, has sadly been a standardized component of the fashion industry. According to The Independent, however, Ireland is set to ban this cruel custom as soon as July.

Ireland would become the seventh country in the European Union and the eleventh in Europe to ban fur farming.

The ruling Fine Gael party, as well as Ireland’s Minister for Agriculture Michael Creed, had been fundamentally opposed to shuttering this industry. In February Creed said that he didn’t want to close down a “legitimate, highly regulated and inspected industry” that employs around 100 people.

According to the Irish Examiner, however, Creed is apparently changing his tune after pressure from politicians and animal rights groups: He will soon propose his own bill to phase out fur farms.

Ireland’s three fur farms in Donegal, Kerry, and Laois have about 200,000 mink stuffed into small, wire-mesh cages. They live there for six months, before being gassed to death and having their pelts ripped from their bodies — for high-end fashion

The old guard, represented here by Creed, has been met with growing opposition and highly promising momentum for those against this industry.

Parliament member Ruth Coppinger currently has the support of Fianna Fail, Sinn Fein, Labour, Independents 4 Change, the Green Party, and the Social Democrat parties to push this legislation through. The groundswell seems too powerful to squash.

Coppinger eloquently explained her reasoning to end the “cruel, backward, and barbaric” practice in parliament last week.

“As solitary, wild, and semi-aquatic creatures, packing mink into metal cages in groups is alien and unnatural,” Coppinger argued. “For that reason Veterinary Ireland asserts that it is impossible to regulate the fur trade and somehow make it kinder. It is not farming at all. The mink are gassed at six months and their skins are pulled off.”

The Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals said this momentous push toward a fur farming ban was “fantastic news,” while others said imposing “lives of misery” on these defenseless creatures was “cruel,” and should’ve stopped long ago.

“With so many countries banning fur production, the U.K. under pressure to ban sales of fur and increasingly more designers eschewing fur in their collections, we hope the suffering caused will soon be relegated to the history books,” said Jo Swabe of Humane Society Europe.

The Irish government has yet to officially state whether or not it plans on legislating the overwhelmingly popular bill, though mounting pressure indicates a strong likelihood.

A poll in October indicated that four out of five people in Ireland supported a ban on fur farms, while several of these farms have recently gone out of business. On the other hand, some say the bill doesn’t go far enough — outlawing production of fur is a great step, but fur sales should be prohibited as well.

According to The Fur Free Alliance, the U.K. spearheaded the ban on fur farming in 2000. Since then, Austria, Holland, Croatia, Slovenia, Norway, the Czech Republic, Luxembourg, Belgium, Macedonia, and Serbia have followed suit. Bosnia and Herzegovina plans to phase it out by 2029.

Alongside Ireland, Poland, Lithuania, Estonia, and Ukraine are currently considering banning the practice as well.

Designers such as Gucci, Versace, Jimmy Choo, and Chanel have already stopped using fur in their collections. Wearing the pelts of tortured animals simply isn’t in vogue anymore, putting this prehistoric industry on the verge of disappearing altogether.

Hopefully, starting next month, Ireland will do its part to eradicate it.

FUR

 

 

USA: The California fur ban just barely passed yesterday in its first Senate vote. To win in the next Senate vote (in 2 weeks), we’ll need your help.

us-flagge_ml

 

The California fur ban just barely passed yesterday in its first Senate vote.

We needed 5 yes votes out of the 9-person committee, and we were stalled at 3 without much time left. A few of us went around the State Capitol lobbying the remaining Senators and even chased the Senate Majority Leader down the hall to speak to him in time.

With just minutes left, we got the last two votes we needed, and the Senate Majority Leader threw up his arms in support when the victory was announced!

When the votes are this close, a single action can tip the scale on either side. 

The fur industry has hired a new lobbyist and they’re going to extreme measures to block the bill. We need your help more than we’ve ever needed it before. We’ve uncovered a disturbing new tactic the industry is using — one that almost killed the fur ban yesterday. And to win in the next Senate vote (in 2 weeks), we’ll need your help.

Can you make a post on social media with #MakeFurHistory to show your support for the bill? You can also direct your friends and family to sign up at FurIsHistory.org and they’ll learn more about how they can help, too.

We’ll also be sharing more updates on the fur ban in the July member call. If you want to become a member and join these more in-depth monthly discussions, you can become a member here.

Wayne

https://www.directactioneverywhere.com/#mabel-intro 

Direct Action Everywhere | PO Box 4782, Berkeley CA, 94704
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Norway: the farms of the blood are over!

 

norwegen flaggejpg

There are about 300 fur farms in Norwayeach year more than 800,000 animals are killed there. That should stop, the new government in Oslo has now decided. But not right now.

Last Monday, the Norwegian government made its decision: By 2025 there should be no more fur farms in Norway! It is a big step forward for animal welfare and also for Norway, a country that led the fox fur production. How this will affect the sale of fur in Norway is still unclear.
According to animal welfare organization PETA, there are currently about 300 fur farms in Norway, where over 700,000 mink and 110,000 foxes are bred and killed each year.

Ppelzfarmen-1.jNorwegenpg

Thanks to Norway’s Liberal Party, which is strongly committed to the welfare of animals and the environment, this proposal was presented last Sunday to the new coalition.

Norway is thus after the Netherlands, which also get out of the fur production in 2024, the country with the second largest fur industry, which has ever issued a ban.

There are 200 to 250 fur farms, which are gradually dissolved, until in 2025 finally no longer exists. The Ministry of Agriculture reported that there are 610,000 mink and 150,000 foxes in the farms.

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Andrzej Pazgan, coordinator for Eastern Europe at the animal welfare organization PETA Germany, said in an interview that the political decision was long overdue:

“In fact, this decision has been discussed for several years, but was repeatedly believed the promises of the fur industry, that the documented farms were only ‘black sheeps’ and that improvements would be possible. “(!!!)

FUCHSPELZ, LANDWIRTSCHAFT,Norwegian fur farmer Per Blilie (C) skins one of his foxes at his farm in Gjovik, Norway, 28 November 2010.

While animal rights activists in Norway and around the world are celebrating the decision, the Norwegian operators of fur farms are appalled that their very existence is at stake. The fur breeders’ association said the producers were “shaken to the core” (!!!)

Fuchs_Ohr_Norwegen

The fight has been going on for a long time, not only for animal welfare organizations, but also for scientists and the Norwegian people. The French daily “Le Monde” reports that 68% of Norwegians are against fur. Further figures confirm this: 99% of the fur trade in Norway would not be possible without exports, especially to Russia and China.

Siri Martinsen, veterinarian and director of the largest non-governmental organization for animal welfare in Norway (NOAH) is relieved:

“This is a great victory for the animals and those who fight for them. The government has finally heard the opinion of the majority of the population and the scientists who call the fur trade sector obsolete and brutal”.

The motion still has to be passed by Parliament, but seven out of nine parties have already voted in favor. So it’s just a formality. The fur farms will be compensated in parallel to the closures.

The Norwegian Veterinary Institute and the Norwegian Veterinary Association also agree and point to the catastrophic living conditions of the animals in the fur farms. What is questioned here is the lack of humanity:

“We reject the cruel conditions that animals are subjected to in captivity. They are not compatible with their physiological needs”.

http://www.holidogtimes.com/de/norwegen-verbietet-pelzfarmen-ab-2025/#gs.jrqjns

 

My comment: And now the fur farm owners complain again: we are financially ruined, our livelihood is broken …
There are many other decent professions: teachers, mail boats, locomotive drivers …. To live from the blood of others is not a job, it is a legalized crime that a civilized society no longer needs and no longer wants.
It is enough shameful that all fur hangmen are compensated with EU funds (our money) for making croupels out of the animals in cages that they gassed, electrified and skinned  alive.

fuchs-verletzt-jpg

The fur mafia is one of the most violent and bloodiest industries in the world and the hypocritical “Origin Assured” label (ie, “safe provenance” fur) is nothing more than a marketing tactic to veil the industry’s true atrocities. The Origin Assured Fur label has one dirty purpose: to make people feel better when they support one of the world’s cruelest industries.

And now a small overview of the success we have had in the fur industry in recent years:

Austria, Great Britain, Croatia, Slovenia, Bosnia and Herzigowina, Serbia and Macedonia have legally prohibited fur farms.

The Swiss Animal Protection Act stipulates how wild animals such as mink and foxes must be kept under zoo standards. These requirements are so high that Switzerland has long been free of fur farms.

In the Czech Republic, a fur farm ban will come into force in 2019, in Norway in 2025.

In the Netherlands, the second largest mink producer in Europe, keeping chinchillas and foxes is already prohibited. The last mink farms will close in 2024.

In March 2019, it was announced that no animals were kept at the last German fur farm in Rahden (NRW). Even though the farm has not yet been deregistered by the local authorities, it can be assumed that no new animals will be used due to the high legal requirements that will apply from 2022 onwards. The penultimate farm in Döhlen (Saxony) was closed in 2018.

In the EU, import and trade in sealskins, as well as dog and cat skins are now prohibited. Unfortunately these come as “faux fur mislabeled in the trade.

And the market leader China, with 69 percent of global fur production, we will soon abolish or damage so badly that China will automatically stop running this bloody fur business.

My best regards to all, Venus

More About Fur Free Prada.

THE PRADA GROUP ANNOUNCES FUR-FREE POLICY   AND JOINS THE INTERNATIONAL FUR FREE RETAILER PROGRAM

 

Following on from our recent post about Prada going fur free:

https://worldanimalsvoice.com/2019/05/23/prada-senza-pellicce/

 

.. we can now bring you more from ‘Respect for Animals’ in England.

Here is a link to their post, and below we have reproduced below what is said:

http://www.respectforanimals.org/the-prada-group-announces-fur-free-policy-and-joins-the-international-fur-free-retailer-program/

 

May 22, 2019 – Today, the Prada Group has announced that it will no longer use animal fur in its designs or new products, starting from their 2020 Spring/Summer Women’s collections. In collaboration with the Fur Free Alliance (FFA), a coalition of more than 50 animal protection organizations from over 40 countries, the Prada Group announcement follows positive dialogue between the luxury brand and FFA members, LAV and The Humane Society of the United States.

“The Prada Group is committed to innovation and social responsibility, and our fur-free policy – reached following a positive dialogue with the Fur Free Alliance, in particular with LAV and the Humane Society of the United States – is an extension of that engagement,” said Miuccia Prada. “Focusing on innovative materials will allow the company to explore new boundaries of creative design while meeting the demand for ethical products.”

Mark Glover, Campaigns Director for Respect for Animals which leads the FFA’s Fur Free Retailer programme in the UK said: “This announcement by Prada is great news and testament to the strength of the compelling anti-fur campaign. 100 million animals are killed every year just for their fur – a product nobody needs. The suffering these animals endure is extreme and completely unnecessary. Today’s announcement is another step towards the day when this appalling treatment of the animals we share the planet with is finally brought to an end.”

“The Fur Free Alliance applauds the Prada Group for going fur-free”, said Joh Vinding, Chairman of the Fur Free Alliance. “The Prada Group with its brands now joins a growing list of fur-free brands that are responding to consumers’ changing attitudes towards animals.”

 “The Prada Group’s decision to go fur-free is consistent with the new concept of ethical luxury and meets the expectations of new consumers who are more careful in choosing sustainable products that respect the environment and animals”, said Simone Pavesi, manager of the Animal Free Fashion Area for LAV.

Brigit Oele, program manager for Fur Free Alliance, said: “Prada Group was one of the fastest companies to go fur-free once positive dialogue began a little more than a year ago. The Fur Free Retailer Program includes 1,000 companies, showing that this global movement is gaining momentum fast, and it’s very unlikely that fur will ever return as an acceptable trend.

This is a great day for animals!”

 

Prada: Senza pellicce!

+++ SUCCESS +++

“Focusing on innovative materials will allow the company to explore new boundaries of creative design while meeting the demand for ethical products.”

—Miuccia Prada, Chief Executive, Prada S.p.A

 

 

For years, PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), as one of Prada’s shareholders, has been pushing for this decision at the annual meetings.

Prada’s fur exit is the result of decades of protests by PETA and its affiliates, who have called for fashion companies to drop their furs with numerous protests – including catwalk storms.

Schöne Karikatur über Pelz und leder_n

Prada’s decision to banish fur from his collections is a triumph for the animals and activists. ♥ 🙏

While PETA applauds Prada’s entry into the ranks of furry fashion houses, we are now calling on the label to do the same to Chanel and, in another compassionate decision, to cancel out the cruelly produced skin of crocodiles, lizards or snakes from future collections. Most consumers do not want to wear anything on their skin, for which animals are beaten with clubs or electrocuted.

peta-mother-fox-print-pelz381484-

Prada’s decision to go fur-free in the future is followed by designers such as Armani, Versace, Ralph Lauren, Vivienne Westwood, John Galliano and Jean Paul Gaultier.

https://www.peta.org/blog/victory-prada-bans-fur/

And we mean.. Another good step to abolish animal suffering, or at least one of the many animal suffering varieties.

Was it our protests, the pressure on the fashion shops, or the thousands of demos and explanations for the consumers that led to this move?
We do not know that. Maybe everything together.
But one thing is for sure: if the fashion designers no longer offer us real fur, then nobody wears it!
It’s that easy!

My best regards, Venus

China: Cruel Cashmere Industry Exposed – The Terrible Suffering of Goats.

China

H&M announces it will stop using cashmere

One giant leap for animal welfare.

H&M is taking a stand against the unethical animal practices still prevalent within the production of clothing.

According to a recent investigation conducted by PETA Asia, this brutality – in the name of fashion – has become even more evident.

From this investigation, a disturbing video has surfaced which appears to expose the cruel realities of cashmere production in China and Mongolia – the world’s two largest cashmere exporters (they supply 90 per cent of it).

The video – showcasing the violent makings of the cashmere jumper – seems to reveal the vile mistreatment of animals, showing goats screaming in pain as workers proceed to tear out their hair with sharp metal combs. More explicit footage appears to capture the inhumane practices within slaughterhouses, where the goats’ throats are slashed in front of the others, while those who are deemed unprofitable are hit in the head with a hammer.

Following PETA’s release of this research, fast-fashion giant H&M has announced that it will be boycotting conventional cashmere and will cease placing orders on the material by the end of 2020. On the brand’s site, you’ll find an outline of H&M’s 2030 goal, which promises ‘to only use sustainability-sourced materials’, with an immediate plan ‘to gradually phase out conventional cashmere’.

Just last year, ASOS updated its animal welfare policy, banning materials like fur, silk, mohair and also cashmere – a move prompted by a discussion with PETA.

It’s time for more fashion brands to follow suit.

peta.org.au

made in Chinan

A new PETA Asia investigation into the cashmere industry in China and Mongolia – the world’s top cashmere exporters – reveals extreme cruelty to and violent killing of cashmere goats.

The video exposé shows goats screaming in pain and fear as workers tear their hair out. Later, their throats are slit at abattoirs and they’re left to die in agony. Goats suffered on every farm in China and Mongolia visited by the eyewitnesses.

Together, China and Mongolia produce 90 per cent of the world’s cashmere.

Workers Stepped on Terrified Goats and Twisted Their Limbs

Eyewitnesses saw workers hold down and step on frightened goats, bending their legs into unnatural positions as they tore out their hair using sharp metal combs.

Combing in the cashmere industry is not as innocent as it sounds.

 

 

No Veterinary Care Provided

Goats left with bloody cuts from the hair-removal process received no pain relief or veterinary care. One worker simply poured rice wine into an animal’s wound.

Goat's found cleaned with wine.

Goats Hit With Hammers and Killed When No Longer Profitable

Cashmere goats deemed no longer profitable endure slow, agonising deaths. At an abattoir in China, eyewitnesses saw workers hit animals in the head with a hammer in an attempt to stun them. In Mongolia, workers were seen dragging goats by one leg onto the abattoir floor before slitting their throats in full view of other goats. They were left to bleed out on the filthy kill floor, and some were seen still moving a full two minutes later.

Goat hit with a hammer in the cashmere industry.

Their flesh is then sold as cheap meat.

Ninety Per Cent of All Cashmere Comes From China and Mongolia

Nearly all cashmere is produced in China and Mongolia, so if you buy a cashmere item, it probably came from goats who were abused in one of those countries.

One goat produces, on average, only 250 grams of hair that can be used for cashmere each year. This is so little that in order to produce just one cashmere jacket, the hair of six goats is required.

Environmental Devastation

Cashmere also has the most destructive environmental impact of any animal-derived fibre. Because cashmere goats must consume 10 per cent of their body weight in food each day and they eat the roots of grasses, which prevents regrowth, the industry is a significant contributor to soil degradation followed by desertification.

Already, 65 per cent of Mongolia’s grasslands are degraded and 90 per cent of the country is in danger of desertification, which has resulted in some of the world’s worst dust storms on record and air pollution dense enough to reach North America.

 

TAKE ACTION

https://secure.peta.org.au/page/41627/action/1