Category: Live Transport

EU: ‘Something is wrong’: why the live animal trade is booming in Europe.

Pro-Brexit supporters burn an EU flag during a UKIP demonstration in central London

 

‘Something is wrong’: why the live animal trade is booming in Europe

 

Regulation breaches and fewer, larger slaughterhouses have led to growing numbers of animals travelling further to slaughter

  • High risk of injuries in Denmark’s live piglet export trade, audit warns
  • The live animal export trade has ballooned in Europe while the commission fails to enforce its own regulations, MEPs have told the Guardian.
  • A second attempt to set up an inquiry committee to look into the handling of the problem is now underway, after an earlier proposal was dismissed in 2018.
  • In the past 20 years the EU has become one of the global centres for animal export. Within the bloc animals are travelling ever-longer distances, and a steadily increasing number are now being exported to non-EU countries.
  • The EU has long prided itself on its high animal welfare standards, and has had legislation on animals during transport since 1991. In 2005 the commission introduced regulations on animal transport that were far ahead of the rest of the world at the time. A European parliamentary resolution last year stated: “The EU is where animal welfare is most respected and defended, and it is an example for the rest of the world.”

But in 2018 Jørn Dohrmann, a Danish MEP, was asked to check how well the 2005 regulations were being implemented. His findings were damning. The parliamentary resolution that followed his report listed rough handling, inappropriate vehicles, overcrowding, high temperatures, failures to feed and water, uneven reporting and inspections, widely varying punishments for infringements (10 times higher fines in some states than in others), and no centralised record of operators that perpetrate systematic breaches of regulations.

  • Dohrmann’s findings were just the latest of many investigations (including some by the commission) to find that regulations were being breached all over the place
  • Read more
  • “We have known for decades that something is wrong,” Dutch MEP Anja Hazecamp told the Guardian. “We really thought that with the new transport regulations things would start to change. But we see the same old problems as we saw in the 90s.
  • “The member states say they want to do something, but they want a level playing field. And the commission says that they need member states to take action. So the same old status quo continues. This is why I am working together with other members of the Animal Welfare Intergroup to get an inquiry committee set up, to look into what is happening. We cannot wait for two more decades for things to change.”
  • “The commission is not doing its job,” Catherine Rowett MEP said. “It is true that quite a lot of good practice does happen as a result of the regulations, but they are not good enough – and they are not being enforced enough. Yes, it will mean more bureaucracy – but that’s what you have to have in order to make sure that profits don’t take precedence over welfare. It is absolutely crazy, it is bizarre that we can’t get this right.”
  • “What is lacking is political will at European commission and member state level to reconfigure the EU livestock sector to avoid long journeys,” said Peter Stevenson, chief policy adviser at Compassion in World Farming.
  • Over two decades the trade has mushroomed at an alarming pace. The EU’s rapporteur states that “long and very long journeys are increasing”. The value of live animal exports across and out of the EU has trebled from $1bn (£763m) in 2000 to $3bn in 2018, according to UN Comtrade data.
  • The reasons for this growth are complex. The liberation of cross-border trade in Europe, and the growing fragmentation of the farming system has meant that food producers have increasingly taken advantage of cost variations in different countries.
  • So, for example, the Danes can produce piglets more cheaply than the Poles (they have bred their sows to give birth to more piglets than other countries) – but the Poles can rear them more cheaply (their labour costs and welfare requirements are both lower). The result is that five million piglets were trucked from Denmark to Poland in 2018 to be turned into Polish sausage.
  • On top of this the EU has expanded east to include countries that have big rural populations and farming sectors, but limited processing facilities. The EU stamp has made their animals even more attractive to buyers, and Romania, Slovakia, Latvia and the Czech Republic are among those that have built up useful export sectors.
  • The trend for fewer but bigger slaughterhouses is also a key factor. Last year Eurogroup for Animals looked into the sector as part of their call for a shift to a trade in meat and carcasses, rather than live animals. They found there were no centrally held figures – but that where numbers were available the pattern was clear.
  • It’s a similar trend to the US – where the shift to larger slaughterhouses occurred much earlier. According to the Animal Welfare Institute, the number of slaughterhouses fell from nearly 8,000 in 1970 to just under 3,000 in 2018. And in the UK, where the Sustainable Food Trust has been monitoring the situation, the number of red meat abattoirs has fallen from about 1,900 in 1971 to 249 in 2018.
  • But industry figures say that the costs involved in mobile slaughterhouses will make them impossible, given the expectations of the modern shopper. “People aren’t going to buy meat which is three times more expensive – and the labour costs for mobile slaughterhouses will be very high,” Rupert Claxton of international food consultancy Gira told the Guardian.
  • “If you are a big commercial farmer wanting to put lamb into a supermarket chain, you need to keep the bacteria count down on the meat so you can have the shelf life that allows the long supply chain to work, so people can take it home and put it in their fridge for a week or 10 days before they want to eat it. In which case you’ve got to go to a big modern plant that can guarantee all those steps have been regulated and put in place. On-farm kill is not a realistic option in this country, or for most of Europe.”
  • The modern shopper’s expectation of cheap meat, plus issues around labour shortages and regulatory demands, put huge pressure on producers, said Claxton, pointing out that in at least one supermarket chain you can currently buy a chicken for about £1.90 a kg.

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  • Hazekamp agrees. “As long as we continue to think that the production of food can’t cost anything, we will not solve this problem.”
  • She is currently pushing for a full official inquiry into the issue. In 2018 Hazekamp and colleagues asked for an inquiry committee to investigate whether the regulations were working. But, despite gathering more than the required number of signatures, the Conference of Presidents instead commissioned the implementation report.
  • But she believes things will be different this time. “The climate has certainly changed,” she told the Guardian. “Animal welfare is no longer a minor issue that can be ignored.”
  • Campaigners believe that under the new commission, headed by Ursula von der Leyen, things look different. “The new team are very different from their predecessors,” points out Joe Moran at the Eurogroup for Animals. “We are obviously dismayed at the growth of this trade, but we are also now more optimistic that new measures will be brought forward by the commission that will begin to address this problem.”
  • A spokesperson for the European commission for health and food safety told the Guardian: “The issue of animal transport is of a major concern for the European commission. Over the past three years the commission has audited member states on road and sea transport to non-EU countries, issued recommendations and is following up on the action plans presented by member states. The commission services are ultimately building evidence to move, if necessary, towards possible proceedings against member states who have systematic non-compliances.”

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/jan/24/something-is-wrong-meps-say-eu-is-failing-to-regulate-live-animal-exports

 

 

Romania: The Live Export Sheep Trade Is Killing Farmers -Romania Needs Meat Processing; and Fast !

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‘A whole sheep for £18’: how live exports are hurting farmers in Romania

 

Country’s lack of meat processing facilities means livestock must be shipped to international markets – at a high cost to both shepherds and welfare

Gheorghe Dănulețiu, also known as Ghiță Ciobanul (Ghiță the shepherd), has more than 500,000 followers on Facebook after he featured in an advertising campaign that went viral, but he leads the modest life of a traditional shepherd.

Looking after 1,500 sheep in western Romania, Dănulețiu’s life changes with the seasons. During lambing in spring, he barely sleeps four hours a night while in winter he leads his sheep in a three- to four-week journey from the mountains down to graze in the valley

Even when the temperature drops below -30C(-22F), Dănulețiu sleeps next to his animals, wrapped in his sheepskin under the starry sky and ready to protect his flock in case of a wolf attack.

“I inherited this [role] from my father – who had a few hundred sheep – but I also love it, I love animals,” Dănulețiu says.

However, like all Romanian shepherds with small and medium-sized flocks, Dănulețiu is struggling in a market dominated by a few live animal exporters, big farmers and hypermarkets.

“The sheep trade has become a mockery,” he says. “We sell a sheep for 100 Romanian leu (about £18). I can’t afford to pay good salaries and I can’t find workers any more – young people see that it’s all going downhill. I have the impression that this is political, that they’re trying to destroy the sector.”

 

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Ireland: ‘It would be kinder to shoot them’: Ireland’s calves set for live export.

Ireland

 

I was involved with Irish calf live exports several years ago – I even wrote a report for the EU on it back in 2010 – a document of 110 pages or more representing a series of combined undercover investigations undertaken by UK (Kent Action Against Live Exports) , French (PMAF), Dutch (Eyes on Animals) and German (Animals Angels) animal welfare organisations.  As expected when it comes to animal welfare, the EU is pretty slow out of the starting blocks.  We / I never had any response to the report; and the calf trade continues to this day – along with all the abuses.  That is why I personally have no faith in the EU.

Here is a link to (basically) what was involved – scroll down until you see the pictures of the calves obtained during the investigations:

https://serbiananimalsvoice.com/about-us/ 

 

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Here is just one small section of one of the investigations which is given in the above – but it does show the non compliances of the trade relating to so called EU Regulations on the ‘protection’ of animals during transport and what the hauliers / staging post owners are doing to avoid the regulations.  A lot of work, which is very detailed and timed to the very minute.  Very valid evidence of a corrupt trade; but a trade which the EU wants everyone to think is controlled by legislation and rules; when in fact, they do not mean a thing:

https://serbiananimalsvoice.files.wordpress.com/2016/02/jh-04-03-2010_report-on-non-compliance-with-resting-times-in-relation-to-controlpost-at-f-heauville.pdf 

 

There is no way to stop this other than switch from cows milk to plant based – by doing so you remove all the cruelty given above – Note – all the time you drink cows milk you are personally responsible by contributing to this suffering; look at the pictures, do you want to be part of this ?

 

So go plant based – Thank you.

 

Regards Mark.

 

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‘It would be kinder to shoot them’: Ireland’s calves set for live export

It would be “kinder to shoot” the hundreds of thousands of unwanted male dairy calves due to be born in Ireland this year, rather than export them to the Middle East or let them die on the farm, experts have told the Guardian.

Irish farmers have hit a streak of gold on dairy exports, and as a result the industry has rapidly expanded, with the national dairy herd rising from about 1m in 2010 to 1.6m this year.

But that creates a whole new problem. Dairy cows generally give birth every year in order to maintain their milk output. But male dairy calves are no use to the farmer as they cannot produce milk, which means that Ireland will need to deal with as many as 800,000 unwanted male calves this year, in what has been described by the Irish agricultural press as a “calf tsunami”.

 

Continue to read this very full report at:

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/jan/20/it-would-be-kinder-to-shoot-them-irelands-calves-set-for-live-export

 

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UPDATE – Romania: 180 Sheep Destined for Slaughter Given Second Chance After Cargo Ship Capsizes.

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Remember that we covered the Romanian incident on this site immediately it happened.

 

https://worldanimalsvoice.com/2019/11/25/mass-grave-in-the-black-sea/

 

https://worldanimalsvoice.com/2019/12/04/romania-caring-activists-take-to-the-streets-and-the-agriculture-ministry-in-support-of-the-14000-sheep-who-drowned-at-midia/

 

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Well now we can provide you with a final ‘Good News’ report for the very small amount of survivors of the consignment. There were concerns at the time that the surviving animals, after such an ordeal, would still be put on another export consignment and shipped off to their deaths in the quickest time possible. Well all that has now changed – some good news for once ! – Regards WAV.

180 Sheep Destined for Slaughter Given Second Chance After Cargo Ship Capsizes

Posted by Heather Shields | January 15, 2020

 

Nearly 200 sheep have a new lease on life after surviving a disaster at sea, and now get to live out their lives in peace at farm animal sanctuaries.

Last November, the Queen Hind cargo ship capsized near the Romanian coast while carrying around 14,000 sheep. All of the ship’s crew members survived, but thousands of sheep lost their lives due to drowning, injuries, and exhaustion.

The ship sinking merely expedited the grim fate of thousands of its passengers as they headed toward Saudi Arabian slaughterhouses. Fortunately, 180 of these gentle creatures withstood the tragic event long enough to be rescued.

The rescuers, also members of animal welfare groups, lobbied for the sheeps’ liberation from the meat trade. Granting their request, Four Paws and their Romanian partner ARCA are working to find sanctuaries to provide homes for the surviving animals.

“We are happy that the Romanian authorities placed the sheep in our care and will continue cooperating with them closely,” said Four Paws Head of the Disaster Relief Unit Jackson Zee. “Shortly after their arrival, our team on-site began to examine them and determine their future care. So far, they are mostly in good condition. Now, they can rest and recover from all the suffering they’ve had to endure recently.”

The sheep are safe at a farm near Bucharest, receiving veterinary treatment. They will remain at the farm until permanent living situations are secured, which shouldn’t be difficult considering numerous individuals and rescues have already come forward to offer new homes for the rescued animals.

For the 180 sheep that overcame the odds, the story ends happily ever after, but for the thousands who died, this tragedy is a powerful reminder that animals are not safe during long-distance transport.

“Our association is shocked by the disaster,” said president of Acebop Mary Pana. “If we cannot protect livestock during long-distance transports, we should outright ban them.”

The easiest way to avoid contributing to such cruelty is to leave animals off your plate and choose plant-based foods instead.

 

 

 

 

 

Nearly 200 sheep have a new lease on life after surviving a disaster at sea, and now get to live out their lives in peace at farm animal sanctuaries.

Last November, the Queen Hind cargo ship capsized near the Romanian coast while carrying around 14,000 sheep. All of the ship’s crew members survived, but thousands of sheep lost their lives due to drowning, injuries, and exhaustion.

The ship sinking merely expedited the grim fate of thousands of its passengers as they headed toward Saudi Arabian slaughterhouses. Fortunately, 180 of these gentle creatures withstood the tragic event long enough to be rescued.

The rescuers, also members of animal welfare groups, lobbied for the sheeps’ liberation from the meat trade. Granting their request, Four Paws and their Romanian partner ARCA are working to find sanctuaries to provide homes for the surviving animals.

 

“We are happy that the Romanian authorities placed the sheep in our care and will continue cooperating with them closely,” said Four Paws Head of the Disaster Relief Unit Jackson Zee. “Shortly after their arrival, our team on-site began to examine them and determine their future care. So far, they are mostly in good condition. Now, they can rest and recover from all the suffering they’ve had to endure recently.”

The sheep are safe at a farm near Bucharest, receiving veterinary treatment. They will remain at the farm until permanent living situations are secured, which shouldn’t be difficult considering numerous individuals and rescues have already come forward to offer new homes for the rescued animals.

For the 180 sheep that overcame the odds, the story ends happily ever after, but for the thousands who died, this tragedy is a powerful reminder that animals are not safe during long-distance transport.

“Our association is shocked by the disaster,” said president of Acebop Mary Pana. “If we cannot protect livestock during long-distance transports, we should outright ban them.”

The easiest way to avoid contributing to such cruelty is to leave animals off your plate and choose plant-based foods instead.

 

 

 

 

 

Nearly 200 sheep have a new lease on life after surviving a disaster at sea, and now get to live out their lives in peace at farm animal sanctuaries.

Last November, the Queen Hind cargo ship capsized near the Romanian coast while carrying around 14,000 sheep. All of the ship’s crew members survived, but thousands of sheep lost their lives due to drowning, injuries, and exhaustion.

The ship sinking merely expedited the grim fate of thousands of its passengers as they headed toward Saudi Arabian slaughterhouses. Fortunately, 180 of these gentle creatures withstood the tragic event long enough to be rescued.

The rescuers, also members of animal welfare groups, lobbied for the sheeps’ liberation from the meat trade. Granting their request, Four Paws and their Romanian partner ARCA are working to find sanctuaries to provide homes for the surviving animals.

 

“We are happy that the Romanian authorities placed the sheep in our care and will continue cooperating with them closely,” said Four Paws Head of the Disaster Relief Unit Jackson Zee. “Shortly after their arrival, our team on-site began to examine them and determine their future care. So far, they are mostly in good condition. Now, they can rest and recover from all the suffering they’ve had to endure recently.”

The sheep are safe at a farm near Bucharest, receiving veterinary treatment. They will remain at the farm until permanent living situations are secured, which shouldn’t be difficult considering numerous individuals and rescues have already come forward to offer new homes for the rescued animals.

For the 180 sheep that overcame the odds, the story ends happily ever after, but for the thousands who died, this tragedy is a powerful reminder that animals are not safe during long-distance transport.

“Our association is shocked by the disaster,” said president of Acebop Mary Pana. “If we cannot protect livestock during long-distance transports, we should outright ban them.”

The easiest way to avoid contributing to such cruelty is to leave animals off your plate and choose plant-based foods instead.

 

EU: Failing Caged Animals – Put MEP’s and Commissioners in a Cage for 24 hours; and then see how quickly things would change !

Pro-Brexit supporters burn an EU flag during a UKIP demonstration in central London

 

 

Put MEP’s and Commissioners in a Cage for 24 hours; and then see how quickly things would change

Mark – WAV.

 

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WAV Comment: I (Mark) am getting on my soapbox here about this; sorry if I have different views to others, but knowing the EU and how it operates; I don’t think we will see that much in the way of change. Nice words and PR’s; and a pile of EU ‘officials’ working day and night to dress it all up; for basically nothing – which means nothing being done in the way of progress for the welfare of animals in Europe.

Have animal welfare / rights organisations across the EU been saying this for years – that ‘conventional rabbit cages have worst welfare score’; and have they not supported this attitude with vast amounts of evidence / proof of the cruelties involved ?. We note that this report says that ‘conventional cages have the worst overall welfare impact score’ – it says nothing about banning them, just simply that ‘it includes recommendations to improve the welfare of these animals in all the systems currently available in the EU’.

In other words; and in my opinion only for this article, the EU ‘policy’ has basically no intention of ‘ending the cage’ as proposed by campaigns by animal welfare groups across Europe. At best, it is regarded by us as a kind of ‘tinkering round the edges’ strategy; which largely keeps current systems; whilst saying to citizens and the welfare groups that ‘improvements have been made’ !. Oh yeah, like what ? – Rabbits; the most farmed animal throughout Europe, we suggest, rabbits we still be kept in cages throughout the EU, and really the EU will have masses of new ‘yukspeak’ legislation that does very little, changes very little; but keeps the farmers and their lobbyists happy – and that for them is the main thing.

 

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Have we not seen the ‘EU approach’ to all this in the past ? – ‘battery cages’ for chickens suddenly take on the new EU name of ‘enriched cages’ – and they move from each bird in an enriched cage now having at least 750 square centimetres of space rather than the old minimum for ‘battery’ cage systems, which was 550 square centimetres; or in other words, roughly the size of one A4 sheet of paper per bird, for their entire lives !

 

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Read – Enriched cages condemned – CIWF – one of the UK’s leading farm animal welfare organisations:

https://www.ciwf.org.uk/news/2010/08/Enriched-cages-condemned

 

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Lets move on to another ‘farm animal welfare’ issue that the EU is involved with and ignores the wishes of its citizens on – Live Exports (live animal transports). Have a look at all the people in Europe calling for change:

https://stoplivetransport.org/

 

.. and the European Parliament demands 8 hours !!!- https://animalwelfareandtrade.com/european-parliament-demands-8-hour-limit

Well, the reality is that despite the ‘demands’ of the European Parliament; the EU Commissioner(s) have the final say; and again in this case, they ignore the wishes of the EU citizens in favour of what is best for them; their own nation, and their lobbyists – and that in a nutshell means ‘NO Change’.

Here we are in January 2020 and nothing has changed regarding live animals being transported across / or from the EU to third countries since the Regulation (1/2005) of yes, 2005.. Reg 1/2005 is still the antiquated ‘bible’ which transporters never adhere to, and now we see the EU trying to invent new words and policies to make ‘live animal transport’ things a bit better, whatever that means ! – basically; the EU does not change to the wants of its citizens; it ignores them and does only what it wants at the demands of the un elected Commissioners.

 

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Another example; Tell me about Monsanto / Bayer and the grip that lobbyists have within the EU – you can read a lot of this in our past posts in the subject. In Austria last month, we had:

 

Austrian leader blocks ban on weedkiller glyphosate, citing technicality

VIENNA (Reuters) – Austria’s caretaker leader on Monday made clear she would not sign into law the European Union’s first national ban on the weedkiller glyphosate due to a technicality, infuriating environmentalists while delighting farmers’ groups.

A large majority in parliament and, polls suggest, the public support banning the chemical because of fears it causes cancer. Austria, a popular tourist destination for its Alpine landscapes, also devotes the largest share of its farmland to organic agriculture of any EU member state.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-austria-glyphosate/austrian-leader-blocks-ban-on-weedkiller-glyphosate-citing-technicality-idUSKBN1YD11Z

 

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We call the ‘technicality’ another name; and that is ‘lobbyists’. All the time the EU sucks up to them and the industry, there is no chance of change, despite what the citizens want. You could say that this is enough to make people want to wave goodbye to the EU; for all its inactions – and you know what, wow, yes, that is exactly what the UK will be doing at the end of January this year. Taking back control; away from all the EU cow poo.

 Not a Happy Bunny – like most in the EU;

Regards Mark.

 

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 From the ‘Eurogroup for Animals’:

 

EFSA concludes conventional rabbit cages have worst welfare score

 

The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has published three scientific opinions on the welfare of rabbits kept in the EU for meat consumption. The conclusions show the need for the European Commission to use this scientific evidence to enact long overdue legislation for rabbits and end caged systems. At the same time, the opinions demonstrate the urgent need for better training of staff during stunning and slaughter of rabbits.

Rabbits are the second most farmed species in the EU in terms of numbers, but there is no species-specific legislation protecting their welfare in the EU. EFSA assessed and compared the welfare of rabbits in different production systems – organic, outdoor, floor pens, elevated pens, enriched cages and conventional cages – and concluded that conventional cages have the worst overall welfare impact score.

The overall welfare impact scores suggest that animal welfare in organic systems, on the other hand, is generally good. EFSA’s Opinion includes recommendations to improve the welfare of these animals in all the systems currently available in the EU. To facilitate the assessment of the welfare of rabbits kept in different systems it also recommends standardizing the use of validated welfare assessment protocols suitable for on-farm use throughout the EU.

Secondly, in response to two mandates, one from the European Parliament and one from the European Commission, EFSA also assessed the welfare problems like to occur in rabbits during slaughter and killing operations. In its Scientific Opinion ‘Stunning methods and slaughter of rabbits for human consumption’, the Authority identified ten welfare consequences resulting from 32 hazards that rabbits can be exposed to before and during slaughter (i.e. during pre-stunning, stunning and bleeding). These are consciousness, not being dead, thermal stress, prolonged thirst, prolonged hunger, restriction of movements, pain, fear, distress, and respiratory distress. 25 out of 32 of the hazards originated from staff, with most being attributed either to a lack of appropriate skills or to fatigue.

EFSA concluded that the preparedness and performance of staff also plays a crucial role in the case of on‐farm killing for purposes other than slaughter, such as disease control operations, and assessed this scenario in another dedicated Scientific Opinion. It identified 14 hazards which result in five welfare consequences: not being dead, consciousness, pain, fear and distress. Again, the staff were identified as the origin for all the hazards, either due to a lack of skills needed or due to the high kill rate that characterizes these operations and results in fatigue.

For both these opinions EFSA linked the hazards, welfare consequences, animal-based measures, origins and preventive and corrective measures, and also proposed mitigation measures to minimize welfare consequences. In assessing preventive measures, the crucial role played by the staff was also acknowledged.

https://www.eurogroupforanimals.org/efsa-concludes-conventional-rabbit-cages-have-worst-welfare-score

 

 

 

 

 

The Human Being – Something To Be Proud Of ???

I hate the human race; and sadly having to fit the description.  They claim superiority and a ‘superior being’ type ‘master of all’ status; whilst in my opinion; they are in fact the masters of destruction and the primary cause of abuse of many kinds on this planet; and that is nothing to be ‘superior’ or proud about.

Please watch this video (link below) and then tell me that I am wrong !

Regards Mark – WAV.

 

I may be adding more later to this post to give further support to my views – if they are even needed.

 

https://secure.animalsaustralia.org/take_action/live-export-shipboard-cruelty/?ua_s=BLE.com

 

Have A Great and Productive 2020 With Your Campaigning – From Mark and Venus.

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Well here we are again drawing this time to the end of another decade – and despite all the bad issues that we have shown on the site; after all, that is what we exist for; to inform people about the bad stuff; with the hope of change; looking back it has also been a very productive year in 2019 for the welfare of animals.

 

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Looking back; the recent disaster at Midia which took the lives of so many innocent sheep is one issue that I cannot forget. The authorities want us to, but after many years involved with live export; it is an issue very much engrained in my ‘system’; I hate it and will forever fight to stop it; all the way to the grave.

 

Animal Aid Unlimited in India are an organisation that I have so much respect for. Where do you start with them ?

 

23,550 calls requesting help for sick or injured animals in Udaipur. Each year more and more people in the city are becoming aware that they can do something when they see an injured animal, by a simple call for help, they are making their first step into becoming an animal protector.

9,384 animals were admitted in Animal Aid’s hospital to receive life-saving medical treatments for serious injuries and illnesses. About 26 new patients were taken in each day. We attempt to cover many of the stories here on WAV; just type in ‘Animal Aid Unlimited’ into the search box to get links to all the past videos.
In addition to the work back at base, AAU also provided 1,092 street treatments for animals who did not require full hospitalization. 1,317 dogs were spayed and neutered once they healed from their injuries. 3,728 incredible volunteers and visitors enriched the lives of animals, many of whom served the animals more than 2 weeks!

AAU also vaccinated 8,266 dogs against rabies both in their hospital and also directly on the street. Finally, 40 animal activists from across India have learned first aid principles and techniques from the intensive AAU First Aid Training Program.

Now that is something to be proud of, and we wish Erika and all the crew there an even better 2020 with their work.

 

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Bloodbath

 

Also, 2019 can be viewed as the year in England when the Hunting Act of 2004 was given long term protection and we will never legally return to the old days of wild animals being hunted to death by those with nothing more than a ‘bloodbath’ blood lust.

 

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We must never forget Jill and the team at ‘Animals Asia; – it is probably best that we give their link as so many positives are covered. https://www.animalsasia.org/uk/our-work/ – with the young and a new positive view on how animals should be treated, we look forward to the day when bear bile farming and the dog meat trade in the Far East are confined as atrocities carried out in past times – rightly in history books where they belong.

 

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The destruction of the Environment is a massive concern for every one of us. The deaths and suffering that is going on in Australia at this very moment, combined with recent events in Amazonia largely to increase space for cattle grazing at the cost of the indigenous peoples only shows that those in power there have one thing on their mind, and nothing else; and that is called ‘money’.

 

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Circuses and sea life centres are really being shunned by the educated public now; and we very much welcome that. It is fantastic to see that some dolphins are even being returned to purpose built sanctuaries for them; where they can once again return to the type of lives that were cruelly taken from them in the past.

Turning to Serbia; it has been a positive year with regard the fur industry. We personally worked with the team at ‘Respect for Animals’ http://www.respectforanimals.org/ in England, and with Slavica and Serbian activists, supplying lots of information and undertaking lots of research which led to getting the fur farming ban introduced at the start of 2019; saving tens of thousands of Chinchilla in the process – http://www.respectforanimals.org/serbian-fur-farming-ban-comes-into-force/

Serbian fur farming ban comes into force

Chinchilla – Saved by the Ban.

 

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In the United States, there have been some really positive moves; and we thank all our US visitors for the work they have done behind the scenes. California has become the first US state to ban the sale of animal fur products http://www.respectforanimals.org/history-made-as-california-fur-ban-becomes-law/ The new legislation, AB44, bans the manufacture and sale of new fur products across the state and is already considered to be the most ground-breaking moment for the anti-fur campaign for many years. We hope and look forward to other states following the example of California.

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Staying in the USA, we have seen a lot of positives with regard ‘killing contests’ – where animals are deliberately killed for prizes etc. In recent months we have seen bans introduced in Massachusetts, Arizona, as well as Coyote killing contests in New Mexico.

Food has been a big issue in America; with many major food chains now providing plant based options as part of the menu. This is great news and reflects the huge amount of people that have decided to change to a plant based diet, thus contributing to cutting down on global warming which is an intrinsic part of the meat production system; and which is very much responsible for some of the huge fires that we have witnessed this year in Amazonia due to forest clearance to make more grazing area for meat cattle. Many of America’s largest food chains have now moved to producing Vegan foods for consumers as part of their range – https://worldanimalsvoice.com/2019/03/20/usa-americas-biggest-food-companies-are-moving-to-meatless/ .

 

https://worldanimalsvoice.com/2019/12/24/usa-americas-largest-vegan-chain-expanding-to-new-york-city/

 

 

We thank Stacey at Our Compass https://our-compass.org/ for working with us, and giving links to many issues and videos associated with a meat free Vegan diet. Thanks Stacey; and keep up the great work !

 

We also say “thank” to our companion commentator Slavica; under the name “eparslavicaepar”, (we know who she is) for the faithful accompaniment (almost) for each article. Comments are a strengthening of our work, even if they are critical!

 

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Whizzing over to South Korea, we wants to give thanks and credit to Korean Dogs.org https://koreandogs.org/ for all their tireless work aimed at stopping the live dog and cat meat trade. On the site given, you can find endless ways to give your support to their work, and we encourage you strongly to do that.

 

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Back here in England, we need to highlight the huge amount of work being done by CIWF all over the world on so many different farm animal issues;   https://www.ciwf.org.uk/our-campaigns/ from the ban the cages campaign in Europe, through to helping pig producers in China to be more animal welfare considerate and change (improve) their methods of farm animal husbandry.

 

All in all; we have just skimmed the surface of what has been a very positive and productive year (in 2019) aiming at helping animals across the world. We cannot cover everything as it would take far too long, but we know that you, our friends and supporters are able to investigate a lot more about specific issues that may be of concern to you.

 

To try and give you a little assistance, we have provided on our site an A to Z listing of major animal welfare organisations, complete with their web site links, in order that you can hopefully find out a bit more much easier. Here is the link to this section:

https://worldanimalsvoice.com/2019/03/31/animal-welfare-organisations-links-to-websites/

 

 

We wish you all a great year in 2020 campaigning for the rights of, and being a voice for animals all over the world. You usually find that animal rights people often have a big interest in human rights also; and we try to do a little here as well. Check out one of our links associated with the Amazon forest peoples https://worldanimalsvoice.com/2019/08/27/indigenous-ecuadorian-women-speak-out-to-support-the-brazilian-amazon-rainforest-people/

 

… and for me (Mark), I especially wish to give support to free Tibet from the current rule of China which is covered so fantastically by London based ‘Free Tibet’ – https://www.freetibet.org/

 

Be a voice and fight the fight – results are never immediate and campaigns can take a long time to win – just look at the League Against Cruel Sports (London) – formed in 1924; but it was not until 2004 that they managed to get Hunting with dogs stopped for wild animals – https://www.league.org.uk/about-us

 

You Can Run, But You Cannot Hide !

Happy New Year for 2020 – Regards Mark and Venus xx.

 

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In memory of 2 great campaigners against live export:  Sadly Missed.

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Mike

 

John C

and John.

https://worldanimalsvoice.com/2019/04/25/england-another-terrible-loss-john-callaghan/