Category: Live Transport

Australia: Another Company Closely Associated With Disgraced Live Exporters Has Its Export Licence APPROVED !

australia

 

Another company closely affiliated with disgraced live exporters Emanuel Exports and EMS Rural Exports has had an export licence approved.

The Department of Agriculture has today granted an export licence to the Kuwait Livestock and Trading (KLTT) company’s Australia subsidiary, Rural Export Trading WA (RETWA).

Here’s what you need to know:

    • KLTT has a horrific track record of animal cruelty and disaster in live exports, and has been implicated in multiple ESCAS breaches and animal cruelty investigations in Kuwait in recent years.
    • RETWA had its export licence cancelled in 2004 by then Nationals Agriculture Minister Warren Truss following 25 high mortality voyages within a two-year period between 2000-2002.
    • When this happened, Emanuel Exports filled the gap providing export services for KLTT.
    • Now that Emanuel Exports has had its licence cancelled, RETWA is stepping back in.
    • It’s another example of the live export shell game, and KLTT is playing the Department of Agriculture for fools.

 

  • RETWA and disgraced Emanuel Exports are closely affiliated trading partners – they’ve shared the same Directors and the same live export ships.

 

  • Graham Daws founded RETWA in 1973, the same year he became director of Emanuel Exports before stepping down earlier this year following the Awassi Express scandal.
  • KLTT leased the Awassi Express, and was the consignee/importer for all five horrific voyages exposed on 60 Minutes this year.

 

How can the Department think it could possibly meet its regulatory obligations in granting this licence?

How can the live sheep export industry and their supporters think this is a good move?

The answer is simple.

This is what business-as-usual for live sheep exporters looks like.

Protecting their mates and doing their best to doing their best to get around government regulations.

This is the best they’ve got.

This is as good as it gets.

If you agree it’s not good enough (and we know you do), write to your MP now.

Tell them this is further proof of the incompetence of the live export regulator.

Tell them it’s clearer than ever before, that the live sheep export industry has no capacity or willingness to change.

Tell them you want political leaders to step up, and start implementing the phase-out now.

An industry that has such reckless disregard for community expectations and Australian regulations has no chance of long-term survival.

Like you, we’re sick to death of this trade, and it’s only a matter of time before it will be brought to an end.

Thanks as always for your support.

Dr Jed Goodfellow
Senior Policy Officer
RSPCA Australia

 

Scotland: ‘Mad cow disease’ at Aberdeenshire farm after BSE confirmed.

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-45901043

‘Mad cow disease’ at Aberdeenshire farm after BSE confirmed

 

A case of BSE – so-called mad cow disease – has been confirmed at a farm in Aberdeenshire.

Rural Economy Secretary Fergus Ewing said a movement ban was now in place on the unnamed farm.

Investigations are under way to identify the origin of the disease – the first of its kind in Scotland in 10 years – which was found after an animal died.

The “isolated” case was identified before entering the human food chain.

There are understood to have been 16 cases in the UK since 2011, with the last in 2015.

‘Lose status’

Chief Veterinary Officer Sheila Voas said: “I would urge any farmer who has concerns to seek veterinary advice.”

She added: “While it is too early to tell where the disease came from in this case, its detection is proof that our surveillance system is doing its job.

“We are working closely with the Animal and Plant Health Agency to answer this question.”

Andrew McCornick, president of NFU Scotland, said: “It is disappointing to learn of this BSE case within the Aberdeenshire area.

“Whilst we lose our negligible risk status, it is not unexpected to see a new case and demonstrates the efficacy of the surveillance measures in place. This simply brings us back in line with the rest of Great Britain, reverting back to where we were 18 months ago.

“When Scotland applied for BSE negligible risk status it was with the full knowledge that there was every possibility of a sporadic case of BSE emerging as has been the case in France and Ireland.”

‘Strict controls’

Ian McWatt, director of operations in Food Standards Scotland, said: “There are strict controls in place to protect consumers from the risk of BSE, including controls on animal feed, and removal of the parts of cattle most likely to carry BSE infectivity.”

BSE stands for bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

In 2015, farming officials confirmed a case of BSE in Carmarthenshire, Wales.

The cow was discovered to have BSE following routine tests carried out when an animal dies on a farm.

 

Also:

https://news.sky.com/story/mad-cow-disease-case-confirmed-on-farm-in-scotland-11528621

https://edition.cnn.com/2018/10/18/uk/scotland-mad-cow-disease-intl/index.html

 

Scottish calves exported from Ramsgate, England – Tuesday 16th October.

The transporter was a CALF transporter, a guy called McCreery, Southern Irish, who has been working out of Scotland for some time taking Scottish calves on P&O via Cairnryan to Larne, then Southern Ireland to Rosslere, then to Cherbourg (France) and on to Spain.

 

More About BSE:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bovine_spongiform_encephalopathy

 

 

England: You Could Say We Are Fed Up Presenting Evidence That Is Ignored – But We Will Never Stop Exposing The Truth.

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Philip (CEO CIWF) and Mark (WAV) have known each other, and campaigned for better farm animal welfare, for about 30 years.

As we are now covering a lot on this site about intensive pig farming and swine flu / fever; maybe it is a good time to show you one of Phil’s investigative reports when he was at one of the worlds biggest pig farms in Mexico.

I hope that it will broaden your experiences and knowledge about the industry; and show that local human residents are also being greatly affected health wise by these facilities.  

Here is the info from Phil’s blog:

Ground Zero

I visited a community that was at the forefront of the swine flu pandemic. It is almost impossible to describe the absolute stench that is emitted from one of the world’s biggest pig farms in South East Mexico.

On our journey, I saw at least 15 large-scale farms littered throughout the area. Despite the stench, smell pollution is the least of the problems presented here. We travelled to a town called La Gloria to investigate why some locals fell ill. They were displaying symptoms of what they believed to be swine flu. I spoke to locals who claimed their drinking water had been contaminated.

To see more on how intensive pig farming effected the locals, watch my latest film.

 

I also worked with the team at CIWF (England) when I was doing a lot re Serbian animal welfare.  Although not pigs, the conditions on some Serbian farms we became involved with were alarming to say the least.  Animals kept in muck and filth way above their hooves; conditions which are certainly not compliant with EU standards for keeping animals.

Here are a few links and some photographs relating to some of the posts I did on farm animal conditions in Serbia.  I think the photographs say it all really.

When we confronted the Serbian government Ministry about all this; they said that everything at the farm was ‘ok’ and that we should not keep hassling them ! – we don’t think it looks ok; do you ?

Swine Flu – Dirty Farms – Human Health Conditions – Ignorant EU – Is there a link ? – I think so.

https://serbiananimalsvoice.com/2010/11/26/serbia-farm-animal-conditions-update-261110-formal-statement-on-conditions-now-provided-by-ciwf-uk/

https://serbiananimalsvoice.com/2010/11/23/serbia-november-2010-conditions-ok-at-a-farm-according-to-serbian-veterinary-ministry-and-complaining-campaigners-dont-pressure-us/

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farm7

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Serbia is an EU ‘Candidate Country’; and things such as what we have exposed should be taken into full review by the EU before Serbia is allowed to join as a member state.

EU flag with hole

 

Personally, I don’t really think the EU is interested in what we expose; just as they are not really interested in the evidence taken by Lesley (Eyes on Animals – Netherlands – https://www.eyesonanimals.com/  ) at the Turkish border re live animals being shipped from the EU.

Watch one of Lesley’s videos here:

 

We live in hope that the EU will wake up; but accept that they like to remain the sleeping club that they are.

All of our welfare groups across Europe are working together as a combined force to try and make farm animal welfare better for the animals – we will never give up until there are changes; no matter how long it takes.

Regards Mark

Above – Mark Touring In the Netherlands with CIWF about farm animal welfare.

Below – Live Export Demo – Brussels, Belgium

demo eu

Golda Aug 2011.JPG

At home – England – In memory of my darling ‘Golda’

– she listened to my gripes every day !.

 

Note:

‘Serbian Animals Voice’ (SAV) was a site set up and dedicated to getting results for strays in Serbia.  The site is still active; with all our campaign work broken down into monthly sectors.  There is a massive selection of photographs from our archives.  We have now moved on to form this site, WAV; to cover global animal rights issues.  All posts from this site are now being posted onto SAV also.

Visit the SAV site at   https://serbiananimalsvoice.com/ 

The Bad …..

Tem19

 

The Good.

Serbia has some great activists !

felix dec 8

EU: Barnier calls for a EU-UK Veterinary Area to LOWER checks on live animals !!

 

EU flag with hole

 

15th October 2018

Barnier calls for a EU-UK Veterinary Area to lower checks on live animals

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Brexit is coming and, inevitably, so is the deadline for the UK and the EU-27 to conclude the withdrawal agreement. On 17 October, the EU heads of State and Governments will meet in a European Council solely aimed at dealing with Brexit. Only after this meeting will it be decided whether conditions are met to plan an extra summit in November, to finalise the talks. Over the past months, the likeliness of a disorderly Brexit, in the absence of a deal, has strongly increased. In most post-Brexit scenarios, measures will have to be adopted to avoid a huge number of animals suffering due to increased bottlenecks at the borders. Eurogroup for Animals thus welcomes that EU Chief negotiator Michel Barnier has taken on board its proposal to work towards an EU-UK Common Veterinary Area.

The impact of Brexit, especially a disorderly one, will be felt at the borders. Thousands of live animals cross the UK-EU27 borders every day, and not only on the island of Ireland. In common with any type of products, live animals have to be checked at the border, which can lead to huge delays and to animals having to wait, often in poor conditions, for days. To better understand what is at stake, one can look at the border between Bulgaria and Turkey, where animals have to undergo all necessary checks and wait an average of six hours, most often without sufficient care and in horrendous conditions. The number of animals that could be crossing a UK-EU border is far higher and, at the moment, the existing infrastructure is not adequate to ensure the welfare of animals is respected during crossings.

Since its creation, the “Brexit and Animals” taskforce [1] has been vocal about the risks such “no deal” Brexit would entail for animals (see also this article). It is in this context that Eurogroup for Animals had informally raised the idea that the EU and the UK should consider a common veterinary area, on the model of what exists between Switzerland and the EU. The EU-Switzerland “single veterinary agreement” implies the equivalence, and thus a complete alignment, between the EU and Swiss rules and creates a joint mechanism to discuss arising issues. Veterinary checks at the border can thus be reduced and even eliminated.

It is thus a clear progress to hear Michel Barnier, the EU Chief negotiator for Brexit, mentioning the possibility of a future EU-UK veterinary area in a public speech he gave on 10 October 2018, explicitly referring to the aim of lowering veterinary checks between both partners.

Next week will be crucial for Brussels and London. Whatever the result of the most recent discussions, especially around the Irish border, it will be important to continue raising animal-related concern throughout the entire process, to ensure animal welfare standards are not – even de facto – lowered as a result.

NOTES:

[1] The Brexit & Animals Taskforce comprises 11 of the UK’s leading animal welfare organisations, working together to ensure that animal welfare is protected and, where possible, advanced as the UK withdraws from the European Union.

 

https://www.eurogroupforanimals.org/barnier-calls-for-a-eu-uk-veterinary-area-to-lower-checks-on-live-animals 

EU crisis 1

40 Pigs Thrown Into the Sea in Animal Transport Horror.

WAV Comment

Bulgaria IS a member state of the European Union.  As such, it is required to adhere to Regulation 1/2005 for the welfare of animals when any livestock is being transported.

This expose shows again that the EU has no control over the transport of live animals; and what’s more, it does not care. Flashy new videos and driver guides etc; which amount to nothing – no changes.  The EU Commission passes the buck of any responsibility back to the member state involved.    The EU just wipe their hands of the situation and turn the other way.   I have experienced this for over 25 years investigating live animal transport within Europe.  Nothing changes despite what the EU thinks. – Mark

Eyewitness: 40 Pigs Thrown Into the Sea in Animal Transport Horror

 

Dramatic video footage of live-animal transport reveals that pigs suffered and died in the summer heat during a four-day ferry journey.

PETA Germany received the footage, which was shot by an eyewitness on the vessel between 24 and 28 July 2018, showing lorries loaded with pigs being transported by ferry from Bulgaria to Georgia.

So far, it’s not known where the pigs were farmed.

According to the eyewitness, the animals were given no water or food while on board and, because the lorries were in the blazing sun, were subjected to extreme temperatures. Weak pigs were left to suffer, receiving no veterinary care. The eyewitness saw 40 ill or dead pigs being taken from the lorries and thrown into the sea.

PETA Germany is currently unable to report the companies responsible for these animals’ suffering to authorities because it hasn’t received enough information to do so. But the group has written to the Bulgarian and Georgian authorities to inform them of the incident and to call for an investigation.

 

What You Can Do

Every week, more than a billion live animals worldwide are transported over long distances, often through blazing heat or freezing cold and without food, water, or veterinary care – as if they were nothing more than freight. Their gruelling journeys typically end at an abattoir, where they face a terrifying death. Others end up in pet shop displays or laboratory cages.

The best way to help animals is never to buy them or their body parts for any reason, but we can also help reduce their suffering by taking action now to call for an end to cruel live-animal transport.

PETA Germany is campaigning against long-distance transport to non-EU countries (page in German). And closer to home, PETA UK is asking Ireland to end the live export of cows.

 

Last year, an estimated 30,000 cows were forced to make long, harrowing journeys from Ireland to Turkey, sometimes in temperatures of up to 41.5 degrees. Exhaustion, dehydration, and death are common during these trips. Ireland plans to export 50,000 cows this year. Contact the country’s Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine to let him know that live export is incompatible with animal welfare and must come to an end.

 

https://www.peta.org.uk/blog/eyewitness-40-pigs-thrown-into-the-sea-in-animal-transport-horror/

 

 

Germany : (Reuters) -Germany gives free rein to boar hunters to contain swine fever risk. And What About German Livestock Transporters Biosecurity ? – Do They Have Any ?

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https://www.reuters.com/article/us-germany-swineflu/germany-gives-free-rein-to-boar-hunters-to-contain-swine-fever-risk-idUSKCN1G51CI

 Jäger mit ermordeten Wildschweine(4)

Germany gives free rein to boar hunters to contain swine fever risk

BERLIN (Reuters) – Germany issued a decree on Wednesday to allow hunters to shoot wild boar year-round to stop the animals, which can carry African swine fever, from passing the deadly infection on to farm pigs.

While no case has yet been detected in Germany’s wild boar population, the spread of the disease in eastern Europe is causing immense concern in Germany, whose pork industry has seen huge growth in exports to countries including China.

A government spokesman said the cabinet’s decision was taken to bring about a “significant reduction” in the wild boar population and contain the risk of farm pigs being infected.

The cabinet also agreed on protection measures which would kick in if a case of swine fever was reported in Germany, such as the creation of security zones around affected areas and mandatory disinfection of animal transportation vehicles.

 

WAV Comment –

See paras 258 to 274 of this following link for further detail:

http://animaltransportguides.eu/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Animal-Transport-Guides-Cattle-2017-1.pdf

 

Disinfection of transport vehicles should always be undertaken after every journey according to EU Reg 1/2005 – otherwise disease could be spread from (possibly diseased) animals that have left the truck, to new animals being loaded onto it.  Its called ‘Biosecurity’ – although in reality, there is little security of disease control.    This is not something ‘new’ from a government; it should be a routine standard for livestock hauliers !

Are we saying that normally German hauliers do not disinfect according to 1/2005 normally ? – seems that way – so according to 1/2005, they should be prosecuted as they are not enforcing EU regulations ! – Does the German government care ? – of course not.

So, blame the wild boar and hunt them all instead.  Much easier to kill rather than disinfecting livestock transporters which haul (infected ?) livestock all over the EU.  Livestock biosecurity and disease control has always been a big issue of mine and I have raised the issue many times with the EU – response – the EU does not give a toss; as with anything associated with live animal transport – this is why EU live animal transport is in such a mess.

– Mark.

 

The virus, which causes African swine fever, is harmless to humans and other animals. But for wild boar and farm pigs, the disease is deadly in almost all cases within 10 days. There is no vaccine against African swine fever.

 FF9

Germany, a major European Union pig producer, has watched with growing concern as the highly contagious disease has spread westward across Europe. A reported case could trigger mass culls.

Animal protection group PETA criticized the cabinet’s decision, saying the government was subordinating animal welfare to economic interests.

 “The de facto cancelling of the off-season will cause great animal suffering, because the young are dependent on their mother during the rearing phase,” PETA said in a statement. “Countless piglets will starve to death.”

Infected wild boars have been found in the Czech Republic and Poland, while backyard pigs with the disease were found in Romania in January.

German farmers have called for 70 percent of the country’s relatively large wild boar population to be culled.

 

WAV – why don’t they (German farmers) call for tightening of biosecurity rules in transporters hauling live animals (ie pigs) all over the country and to other parts of Europe.  A kind of link with Bovine TB in the UK – probably not badgers spreading, but the fact that TB infected livestock is transported all over the UK in trucks that may not be disinfected after each consignment.  Again; blame and kill Badgers – it is much easier than enforcing rules for hauliers ! – Mark.

German Agriculture Minister Christian Schmidt has rejected a plea from the farming association to refrain from imposing an export ban if African swine fever was identified in wild boars, saying Germany was not in a position to bypass EU rules.

USA: Activists Brand Themselves with Hot Iron To Show The Suffering Inflicted On Many Farm Animals.

USA-Flagge

 

Activists Brand Themselves with Hot Iron

Demonstrators acting as ‘farm workers’ dragged four animal rights activists across UN Plaza. Then, a searing hot iron heated to 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit was plunged into the activists’ arms and shoulders as they grimaced in pain.

In a statement, In Defense of Animals President Marilyn Kroplick, M.D. highlighted the importance of the peaceful protest: “We brought the hidden suffering of billions of animals to the streets of San Francisco on Mahatma Gandhi’s birthday with his message, ‘be the change you want to see in the world’. You can make a difference by choosing vegan options and enjoy benefits to your health, animals, and the environment.”

The first human-branding protest for animal rights occurred in Israel on World Day for Farmed Animals in 2012. It sparked an international movement called 269Life and the practice quickly caught on in other parts of the world, including Italy, Argentina, Australia, and the United States. The movement was named in honor of Calf 269, who narrowly avoided death when he was rescued from an Israeli dairy farm.

To date, thousands of animal activists around the globe have demonstrated their solidarity with the food industry’s animal victims by having the number 269 tattooed or branded into their flesh.

The human-branding protest in San Francisco yesterday was the first of its kind to take place in the state of California.

 

WAV Comment  – well done them for showing the world the suffering inflicted on many farm animals every day – effective !