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Romania: bison population boosted by eight more animals!

A herd of eight European bison has just arrived in the Southern Carpathians rewilding area and will soon join the 57 bison that are already roaming free here. A keystone species, the animals are part of a rewilding initiative that is benefitting local communities.

bison-Rumänien jpgThe moment of release for one of eight European bison added to the herd in the Southern Carpathians. Daniel Mirlea

Record-breaking rewilding

A herd of eight European bison (two males, six females) arrived in the Southern Carpathians rewilding area in Romania yesterday evening, and will soon join the 57 animals that are already roaming free here.

Rewilding Europe and WWF Romania have been reintroducing bison into the Țarcu Mountains (part of the Southern Carpathians) since 2014, with this record-breaking initiative creating the largest wild bison population in Romania for 200 years.

Bison-Rumänien 6

The European bison is a keystone species that have a large impact on the landscape, allowing many other species of flora and fauna to thrive through their grazing, browsing, and other interactions with their habitat.

Rewilding Europe and WWF Romania are also using the return of the bison to the Țarcu Mountains as a way to support local communities, by developing the area as a nature tourism destination, and through community-based and educational initiatives, scientific research and technological innovation.

“Every bison reintroduction and every birth in the wild is a success for the conservation of these vulnerable animals,” says Southern Carpathians rewilding team leader Marina Drugă. “Going beyond this, they can benefit local wild nature and people in so many different ways. In this regard, they are more than a keystone species here.”

The journey to freedom

The two males and six females began their long journey to the wild from five reservations in Germany (Wisentgehege Springe, Wisentgehege Donaumoos, Nationalpark Kellerwald-Edersee, Nationalparkverwaltung Bayerischer Wald and Wisentgehege Hardehausen).

The Springe reservation hosted the females for several months in order to form a compact herd, a method that ensures the group has a smoother transition to its new environment.

“The transport required extensive preparation,” explains Florin Hălăștăuan, a project officer attached to the Rewilding Southern Carpathians team. “From the bison selection process, which is important for genetic diversity, right through to the fitting of GPS collars, we always focus on the wellbeing and successful reintroduction of the animals.”

Bison-Rumänien 2 pgThe newly released European bison explore their acclimatization enclosure. Daniel Mirlea

 

Continue reading “Romania: bison population boosted by eight more animals!”

France set to Murder 18,000 turtle doves this Autumn — at the Request of Hunters.

WAV Comment:

One of the first meetings Pompili granted while in her new role was with the president of the French National Federation of Hunters.

Well what a surprise !!

`Minister of Ecological Transition`, – for animals, birds, wildlife; that means simply from ‘living’ to ‘dead’ we would assume.

France set to shoot 18,000 turtle doves this Autumn.

Barbara Pompili, the French government’s new Minister of Ecological Transition, has presented a draft decree that would allow the killing of some 18,000 European Turtle Doves this autumn:

https://www.birdguides.com/news/france-set-to-shoot-18-000-turtle-doves-this-autumn/

 

Barbara Pompili, the French government’s new Minister of Ecological Transition, has presented a draft decree that would allow the killing of some 18,000 European Turtle Doves this autumn.

Pompili only assumed the role at the start of July but, on Wednesday [22 July 2020], a directive to allow the hunting of the Threatened species was put up for consultation on the website of the Ministry of Ecology. Despite the decree acknowledging the worrying status of European Turtle Dove, it also lays out the plays to ‘take’ 17,460 of the birds.

Barbara Pompili, the French government’s new Minister of Ecological Transition, has presented a draft decree that would allow the killing of some 18,000 European Turtle Doves this autumn.

Pompili only assumed the role at the start of July but, on Wednesday [22 July 2020], a directive to allow the hunting of the Threatened species was put up for consultation on the website of the Ministry of Ecology. Despite the decree acknowledging the worrying status of European Turtle Dove, it also lays out the plays to ‘take’ 17,460 of the birds.

In 2015, the IUCN Red List upgraded European Turtle Dove from Least Concern to Vulnerable, on the back of a wretched 78% decline since 1980. In western Europe, the species has suffered a particularly profound range retraction and drop in numbers. France sits on an important migration route for the dove.

To set this quota, the ministry relies on the advice of a committee of experts, who recommended that, temporarily, no European Turtle Doves were shot, in order to maximise the chances of a population stabilisation, or that half the estimated population be killed – some 18,000 birds – which is allegedly ‘sustainable’ based on demographic models.

One of the first meetings Pompili granted while in her new role was with the president of the French National Federation of Hunters.

EU: How is the exotic pet trade (un) regulated across the EU? Our report has been updated.

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Exotic pet trade urgently needs regulation: Europe needs “Positive ...

How is the exotic pet trade (un) regulated across the EU? Our report has been updated

22 July 2020

News

An updated overview of the legislation on exotic pets in the Member States is now available on Eurogroup for Animals’ website. 

The report, whose first version was published in 2013, analyses the national legislations regarding the keeping and sale of exotic pets in the Member States, as well as the UK, Switzerland and Norway. 

The report exposes  the large diversity of legislation between the countries, which leads to enforcement issues and disruptions of the European internal market. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic further highlights the importance of more control of the species present in and entering the European territory.

For these reasons, and because of the exploding trend in the keeping of non-domesticated pets, Eurogroup for Animals is calling for the adoption of an EU-wide Positive List  clearly stating which animal species are allowed to be kept and sold as pets. This system has already been adopted in five Member States,  four more than in 2013 when the first version of the report has been published. Its adoption at EU level would  have a positive impact on animal welfare, human health, EU and global biodiversity conservation, as well as on the functioning of the internal market.

Eurogroup for Animals takes the opportunity to thank our members for their input and support with the publication of this report. 

https://www.eurogroupforanimals.org/news/how-exotic-pet-trade-un-regulated-across-eu-our-report-has-been-updated

The Illegal Pet Trade - The Heathfield Vine

Fighting the heartbreaking trade in exotic pets | Foreign Office Blogs

The “Lohengrin” swan- an unforgettable experience with a film animal.

It was January 2012 if I remember correctly.
At the theater where I work, Richard Wagner’s opera “Lohengrin” had just been, all performances were sold out.
A swan plays an essential role in this opera. He comes with a boar and brings Lohengrin on stage for the first time.

_Lohengrin. schwan jpg

The director really wanted a living swan for this scene.
And it was a film animal that came from a dirty agency 2 hours away from our city.
Every evening, during rehearsals, he sat alone in his cage, silent, and was exposed to very high intensity of sounds coming from the wind instruments that were positioned on the stage and not in the orchestra room in this production.
He looked at me with his keen eyes and trembled every time I tried to stroke him through the bars behind the stage.

Schwan

The same torture every night, the unbearable noise that definitely tormented him because swans have very sensitive hearing, and then the strenuous journey of 2 hours to a dirty dark hole in the agency where he belonged.
We had received information that this agency was a small, unprofessional one with pigs, reptiles, birds, and lots of dogs.

The agency brokered these animals mainly for German television productions.

The management could not be convinced, a plan had to be found.
I have spoken to animal-friendly colleagues and have promised to help.
My plan was to stage an “accident”, that was the only way to put something in the veterinary office’s hand to ban the swan.

One night it was time.
We are all on stage, choir, soloists, the trombones, and the swan on a pedestal, he was not bound.
He was “trained” to stay where his slave owner wanted it.

With a sudden nudge, I pushed him cleverly towards to the orchestra room, the swan was startled and at that moment he flew over the orchestra, over the audience, he made a big bow in the auditorium and landed on the chandelier in the middle of the big hall.

The performance was interrupted, the maestro was waiting for instructions, what should happen now, with an animal flying freely over the heads of the spectators???
This was forbidden, according to security regulations.
The swan was caught again but everything went on without him.
For this evening and every evening, the swan was no longer with us.

The help of the colleagues came the next day: the telephone at the veterinary office did not remain silent, everyone wanted to report the “accident” and say that animals on the stage endanger safety.

That was the only way for us to reach the goal, the veterinary office saw otherwise no animal cruelty in this case.
The Veterinary Office has banned the swan from being used, and after this incident, the management has stopped bringing animals onto the stage. Until today.

Many have connected the action with my person, but this is not correct.
We have all tried to save the animal at least from this slave function, from this production.
We owed it to him.

I don’t know where our “Lohengrin” swan is today, whether he is still alive …
I often think of him and often see his dark, sad eyes in front of me.

We cannot save all animals when they need it.
But if ONE animal is suffering from our eyes, we have to try to save it.

Regards and good night, Venus

Wales: Start the Day With Great News – From December 2020 Wild Animal Circuses are Banned In Wales. Cruel Circuses are Now Banned In England, Scotland and From 12/20, Wales Also.

wales

 

Circus March 3

 

BREAKING: We did it! Wild animal circuses will be banned in Wales

 

Dear Mark,

Thank you, thank you, thank you!

I am delighted to share the great news with you that as of 1st December 2020,

wild animal ciruses will be BANNED in Wales!

Yesterday the Welsh Senedd UNANIMOUSLY voted the new bill into law, which will make the use of wild animals in circuses illegal from 1st December 2020.

This now means that from December these cruel circuses will be banned across Britain, with bans already in place in Scotland and England.

Read more here: https://www.freedomforanimals.org.uk/breaking-welsh-government-votes-to-ban-wild-animals-in-circuses/

This victory has been a long time coming, with dedicated activists like you fighting for a ban for years. And it has taken a mix of campaigning tactics to achieve – from protest on the ground outside circuses, to lobbying lawmakers to support this ban.

 

circus no smile

 

Of course we still have work to do, as not all animals will be covered by this ban. Sadly ‘domestic’ animals were excluded from the bill despite the fact that they too suffer for entertainment. But we can take this victory today and use it to fuel our efforts for these animals too – until all are free!

For now, please go and celebrate this fantastic news, and come back tomorrow ready to campaign once more.

Thank you so much again for your efforts in this fight. You have made history for animals!

For the animals,

Sam Threadgill
Director

 

P.S. Thank you for all your efforts in this long fought campaign.

What a fantastic victory for animals!

 

circus2

you did it 2

 

 

 

Nigeria: ‘Worst outbreak ever’: Nearly a million pigs culled in Nigeria due to swine fever.

Nigeria

 

“ASF is harmless to humans but in pigs and wild boar the fatality rate is nearly 100%, and there is no vaccine against it.

Safety depends on controlling animal movement and ensuring hygiene in farms, slaughterhouses and abattoirs. In Nigeria, many farms are not up to the task”.

 

From ‘The Guardian’ press – London.

 

‘Worst outbreak ever’: Nearly a million pigs culled in Nigeria due to swine fever

 

Farmers report devastating losses as poor control measures are blamed for spread of infection across the country

 

Source:

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/jun/18/worst-outbreak-ever-nearly-a-million-pigs-culled-in-nigeria-due-to-swine-fever

 

Hundreds of thousands of pigs have been culled by Nigerian farmers in response to an explosion of African swine fever (ASF). The outbreak began around Lagos and parts of neighbouring Ogun state earlier this year, pig farmers say, but has now spread to many other parts of the country.

In the absence of official data, farmers who spoke to the Guardian estimated that nearly a million pigs had been put down so far. Mrs Bello, a farmer at Lagos-based Oke-Aro, the largest pig co-operative in west Africa, who preferred not to give her first name, said the co-operative alone had culled around 500,000 pigs. So far the virus has spread to more than a quarter of Nigeria’s 36 states.

In the past decade, ASF has regularly surfaced in several parts of Africa. Between 2016 and 2019, more than 60­ outbreaks were reported across the continent.

But the recent wave of infections is the worst by far. We have never experienced anything of this scale in the past. This is the worst and largest outbreak ever,” says Ayo Omirin, a pig farmer at Oke-Aro, who has lost more than 600 of his 800 pigs.

Another farmer, Lawrence Adeleke, who had been in the pig business for decades, recently died. The outbreak struck his farm in April, his son Adeleke Adedayo told the Guardian. Within two months, nearly all of the 100 or so pigs had died and the pens were shut down. In 2007, when a similar outbreak hit the farm, only three of nearly 100 pigs survived.

“When he returned from the farm the day we lost the last set of pigs, he stopped talking to anybody for three days. He was always absent-minded and withdrawn,” said Adedayo. “He only spoke about the losses in the farm. He talked about all his labours for many years vanishing in a few days. He felt he was too old to start all over again. We all felt helpless. On the morning of 2 June, his birthday, he died.”

The farmers who spoke to the Guardian estimated that the pig industry in the country has lost up to 20bn naira (£40m), and that more than 20,000 jobs are at risk. The outbreak comes at the same time as coronavirus, which has infected 17,148 people and led to 455 deaths, according to figures released by the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control.

“A lot of pig farmers may not fully recover from their losses even in the next two years. Some farmers have left the industry already. At the moment, we have no clear picture of how the industry is going to bounce back,” said Omirin.

In recent years, the popularity of pig farming has grown in Nigeria. It is seen as an escape from poverty for low-income households and is also popular with the expanding middle class. By 2009, the pig population had risen from 2 million in 1984 to over 7 million, according to figures from the National Veterinary Research Institute (NVRI). Numbers have probably doubled since then. Read more

The government has taken some action in the crisis, distributing bags of seed and fumigating infected pens. But farmers say this is rarely enough to see them through the rough road to recovery or offset their losses.

“The government did nothing much,” said Bello, “when you consider that most farmers are now plunged into serious debts because of the loans they took to keep their farms.”

ASF is harmless to humans but in pigs and wild boar the fatality rate is nearly 100%, and there is no vaccine against it. Safety depends on controlling animal movement and ensuring hygiene in farms, slaughterhouses and abattoirs. In Nigeria, many farms are not up to the task.

“I suspect the outbreak started last year but the farmers were perhaps selling the infected pigs before it was noticed. This year the disease exploded,” said Dr Pam Luka, ASF researcher at the NVRI. “Activities like this only keep the virus circulating in the country in a cycle.”

A further problem comes from poor record keeping. According to Luka, local authorities rarely have any data for the outbreak. Figures kept by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), which should be notified of ASF cases, are significantly lower than the numbers quoted by farmers. OIE told the Guardian that they had received a notification about the recent outbreak on Tuesday.

Nigeria currently has no database for issues related to animals and disease outbreaks, says Luka; he is currently working with the government to build one..

He is also working with other scientists to understand how the virus is transmitted among pig farms in Africa. But he believes that the situation will only improve when farmers are more proactive and local authorities intensify safety measures and support for the pig industry.

————————

 

 

 

We’ve never had a better chance …

… to make a greener world. Covid-19 has delivered unusual environmental benefits: cleaner air, lower carbon emissions, a respite for wildlife. Now the big question is whether we can capitalise on this moment. The Guardian aims to lead the debate from the front.

As an open, independent news organisation we investigate, interrogate and expose the actions of those in power, without fear. Our independence gives us the freedom to make important organisational choices in service of the environment: we have committed to carbon neutrality by 2030, divested from the oil and gas sectors – and renounced fossil fuel advertising. With your help we can bring about improvement.

The Guardian believes that the climate crisis we face is systemic. We will inform our readers about threats to the environment based on scientific facts, not driven by commercial or political interests. We will keep reporting on the efforts of individuals and communities around the world who are fearlessly taking a stand for future generations and the preservation of human life on earth. We want their stories to inspire hope.

We’re determined to provide journalism that helps each of us better understand the world, and take actions that challenge, unite, and inspire change – in times of crisis and beyond. Our work would not be possible without our readers, who now support our work from 180 countries around the world.

 

 

 

 

 

don’t be part of the evil machine

anonymous diary industriejpg

Many people seem to be under the impression that by buying a glass of milk is somehow “different” to buying a steak—not true.

The reality is that dairy is beef and beef is dairy.

You CANNOT fund one without funding the other.

Here’s how: when you buy a dairy product like cheese or milk, you pay for a cow to be fisted in order to impregnate them (so they can lactate) and create someone’s future steak.

Males will be murdered shortly after birth, and females will grow up as sex slaves having that whole process repeated to them until they, too, are sent to the slaughterhouse.

Schlachtwanne

And the same is true of the other products of abuse that people buy.

The egg industry is the chicken industry.
The wool industry is the lamb industry.
To buy eggs or wool is to fund murder and slavery.

Stop being a cog in the evil machine.

Anonymous for the Voiceless

 

Regards and good night from Venus

 

Latvia: Wolf Hunting Update From Sandy.

howlingwolfmoon graphic

 

Re our recent post about wolf hunting in Latvia:

https://worldanimalsvoice.com/2020/04/29/latvia-organized-hunting-criminality/

 

We have been sent the following message from Sandy – thanks Sandy for your important information which says it all really.

Again, the EU looking the other way when it wants to.

 

As per this update from Sandy; we would encourage any of our followers to provide us with further updates or information to our posts.

We are keen to hear more from Dawn about the bullfighting issue / experience she has been getting – contact us Dawn please if you have anything more to provide.

 

Regards Mark

 

Dear Venus!

Thank you for your information about the egregious situation of lynx and wolf hunting in Latvia.

As to the large carnivores Latvia has signed the European Council’s Directive 92/43/EEC on the conservation of natural habitats and of wild fauna and flora.

Lynx is listed under Annex II (lynx habitats have to be designated as strictly protected areas) and Annex IV (need of strict protection). In 2004 the hunters’ lobby group from Latvia with no appropriate scientific assessment of the species wolves and lynxes made efforts in the EU to get exemption for Latvia as to wolves and lynxes hunting.

For lynxes the exemption from Directive was reached only to Annex II (no need to designate specially protected areas), but there is no exemption as to Annex IV for Latvia as the EU member state.

As lynxes are subject to the Habitats Directive’s Annex IV regime in Latvia, the only way provided in the Directive to make exceptions to the killing prohibition is through derogations.

The EU should know that there is a blatant violation of Directive 92/43/EEC as regards the hunting derogation of lynxes and wolves in operation in Latvia.

Thank you and
best regards,
Sandy