Category: Hunting

USA: Groups to Host Screening of Documentary Film that Exposes the Shadowy World of Wildlife Killing Contests.

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For Immediate Release: February 20, 2020

Groups to Host Screening of Documentary Film that Exposes the Shadowy World of Wildlife Killing Contests

First Gentleman of Colorado Marlon Reis will give remarks

DENVER, CO – The Institute for Human-Animal Connection, Sturm College of Law, and DU Media, Film & Journalism Studies, in partnership with Project Coyote, will host Banning Wildlife Killing Contests in Colorado on Wednesday, Feb. 26, at the University of Denver. This free event will raise awareness about wildlife killing contests in Colorado — where participants compete to kill wild animals, including coyotes and prairie dogs, for entertainment and prizes. For information and to RSVP, click here.

The event is part of the 2nd Human-Animal Coexistence Catalyst Series Event and will feature a screening of Project Coyote’s award-winning documentary KILLING GAMES ~ Wildlife In The Crosshairs. The event will include remarks by First Gentleman of Colorado Marlon Reis and a discussion session with Project Coyote Executive Director (and KILLING GAMES Director) Camilla Fox and Project Coyote Science Advisory Board member and Professor Emeritus at the University of Colorado Marc Bekoff.

Thousands of wild animals are killed in wildlife killing contests every year throughout the nation. There have been at least 18 contests in Colorado over the last five years, primarily targeting coyotes, bobcats and prairie dogs. Public scrutiny has caused many contest organizers to take their events underground, so the actual number of contests may be much higher. In Pueblo this year, teams paid $100 to enter the High Desert Coyote Classic. Teams who killed the “biggest,” “littlest,” and “ugliest dogs” won prizes.

“Given the myriad benefits of wild animals and their habitats to our beautiful State, I am excited to highlight the need for reforms to wildlife killing contests,” said Marlon Reis, First Gentleman of Colorado. “We can and must do better for the humane treatment of wildlife throughout the nation.”

In 2019, a coalition of organizations — including the Animal Legal Defense Fund, the Animal Welfare Institute, the Humane Society of the United States, Project Coyote, and WildEarth Guardians — submitted a citizen petition asking the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission to consider revising current regulations to ban wildlife killing contests for small game and furbearing animals. Colorado’s current regulations allow each contest participant to kill up to five animals per species over the course of one contest. The Commission may hear that petition at its next meeting in March. If the Commission decides to advance the petition, CPW staff will begin to develop proposed regulations, which will be open for public comment.

“Not only do wildlife killing contests undermine the moral fabric of our society, they are ecologically destructive,” said Marc Bekoff, professor emeritus of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Colorado, Boulder, co-founder with Jane Goodall of Ethologists for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, and member of Colorado’s Governor’s Coalition for Animal Protection. “In short, there is no credible evidence that wildlife killing contests serve any beneficial wildlife management purpose.”

Contest organizers frequently claim that killing contests reduce coyote population numbers long-term, increase the abundance of species like deer, and protect livestock from coyotes. The best available science does not support these claims. Indiscriminate lethal control of wildlife including coyotes and prairie dogs is harmful to ecosystems. Randomly killing coyotes can even increase their numbers and increase conflicts with livestock.

“Project Coyote produced KILLING GAMES ~ Wildlife In The Crosshairs to shine a light on this bloodsport,” said Camilla Fox, founder and executive director of Project Coyote and director of the film. “We’re working with our coalition partners, ranchers, hunters, Native American tribal leaders, and community members to relegate these brutal events to the history books, just as advocates did with dogfighting and cockfighting.”

Wildlife killing contests have been outlawed in five states. Arizona and Massachusetts banned killing contests for predatory and furbearing species in 2019; New Mexico and Vermont abolished coyote killing contests in 2019 and 2018, respectively; and California prohibited the awarding of prizes for killing nongame and furbearing animals in 2014.

KILLING GAMES will also be shown at the Colorado Environmental Film Festival on Feb. 22 at the American Mountaineering Center in Golden. Purchase tickets here.

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To learn more about wildlife killing contests, visit the National Coalition to End Wildlife Killing Contests website here and read this Op-Ed in The Colorado Sun here.

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“In loving memory of Mike Hill”

 

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“At 4.00 pm Saturday 9th February, 1991 Mike Hill became the first hunt saboteur to be killed whilst trying to protect wildlife. Mike was only 18 and for two years lived and breathed animal rights, not just dogs and cats but every living creature.

He was a vegan, worked at both Heavens Gate Sanctuary and Freshfields Animal Rescue Centre and was an active sab with Yeovil sabs and Merseyside sabs.

Mike was to nice a person for this world. There was no hurt nor malice in his soul. He thought good of everyone and everything. He was quite, unassuming, softly spoken and gentle.

He lived and died for his beliefs.

 

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The facts

Hunt Saboteur, Mike Hill, was killed on the 9th of February 1991 at a meet of the Cheshire Beagles.
Towards the end of the day’s hunting, with no kill under his belt, the huntsman boxed up his hounds in a small blue trailer being towed by an open-top pick-up truck.

The kennel huntsman, Alan Summersgill, with another man, jumped into the pick-up and, on impulse, three sabs who were nearby, jumped onto the back of it to prevent them driving the pack to another location to continue hunting.

Summersgill drove off at high speeds down winding country roads for 5 miles with the terrified sabs clinging onto the back. It is thought that Mike, jumped from the pick-up as it slowed to take a bend.  He failed to clear the truck properly, and was caught between the truck and the trailer, which crushed him.

Mike died where he lay on the road.

Despite the thud, and the screams of the other sabs, Summersgill continued driving for a further mile. The truck only came to a halt when one of the sabs smashed the rear window of the cab.

The sab was hit with a whip as he tried to stop the truck. Once it had stopped one sab ran back to Mike’s prone body while the other ran to a nearby house to call for an ambulance. Summersgill drove off.

He later handed himself in at a police station. No charges were brought against him and in a travesty of justice, a verdict of ‚Accidental Death‘ was brought at the inquest.
When the ban on hunting came in, Summersgill was still hunting hares.

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http://totalliberation.blogsport.de/repressionschronik/ermordete-aktivist_innen/mike-hill/

 

My Comment: On April 3, 1993, Tom Worby, a 15 year old hunting saboteur, was crushed under the wheels of the Cambridgeshire Foxhound Hound Van. We reported about it: https://worldanimalsvoice.com/2019/12/28/england-hunting-sabotage-against-the-fox-massacre/#comments

No action was taken against 53-year-old hunter Tony Ball, the murderer of Tom Worby.
Mike Hill’s killer, Alan Summersgill, was also acquitted. In both cases there was a ridiculous process, the verdict was: “Accidental death”!

When it comes to hunter crimes, the courts show shamelessly how cooperative they are with the hunter caste.
On the other hand, these two cases show that those who regularly shoot innocent animals lose their compassion and respect for people!

Hunting means systematic dehumanization and brutalization!
Hunters are walking time bombs for humans and animals!
This bloody pleasure for psychopaths must finally end!

 

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My best regards to all, Venus

UK: British Explorer Sir Ranulph Fiennes labels trophy hunters ‘Bullying Bastards’ and calls for UK import ban.

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Ranulph Fiennes labels trophy hunters ‘bullying bastards’ and calls for UK import ban

 

 

Explorer says halting imports would recognise the devastating impact of colonialism on wildlife

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/feb/17/ranulph-fiennes-labels-trophy-hunters-bullying-bastards-and-calls-for-uk-import-ban-aoe?CMP=share_btn_tw&page=with%3Aimg-3

 

Banning the import and export of big game hunting trophies would recognise the destructive impact European powers have had on wildlife in former African and Asian colonies, Sir Ranulph Fiennes has said.

Speaking to the Guardian, the veteran British explorer said hunting endangered species such as rhinos, elephants and lions to keep their body parts as trophies should be viewed with the same scepticism as Chinese traditional medicine in terms of the damage it does to biodiversity.

The 75-year-old explorer, who spent a large part of his childhood in South Africa, has called for trophy hunting to be “stopped country by country” and said efforts to halt the extinction of wildlife around the world were hypocritical while big game hunting was still allowed.

Reflecting on his early years in Cape Town and the influence of the British empire on trophy hunting, Fiennes said: “Just as much as the Belgians in the Congo and the French elsewhere, they unleashed the plague of persecuting animals – not like the locals did to eat, but purely for the pleasure of killing. That started the devastating damage to many, many wonderful species.”

Comparing trophy hunting with the demand for ingredients such as powdered rhino horn in traditional medicine in Asia, he added: “It’s not medically proven in any way. And yes, it goes on. China is particularly guilty, as are South Korea and many other countries in that area.

“You’ve got the empire lot and the weird medical quack lot both going on to this current day and it’s got to be stopped country by country. We can stop it in the UK at least and thereby feel slightly less guilty because of our ancestors.”

Fiennes’s comments come during a consultation by the British government on applying controls to trophy hunting, including a proposal to ban imports, that was laid out in the Queen’s speech. In the wake of the death of Cecil the lion in 2015, France, Netherlands and Australia introduced bans on the import of lion trophies.

Last year, the Guardian revealed lion bones, leopard skulls and an ottoman chair’s elephant leather were among the 74 rare animal body parts legally brought into the UK in 2018.

Under international rules overseen by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), trophies can be moved around the world if they do not affect the survival of a species.

Fiennes said: “Bearing in mind that climate change is helping to remove animals and in 50 years time probably humans as well, now is the time for us to get into a position without being hypocritical.

“We are all hoping that Boris will see that cruelty is what we’re talking about – bullying bastards are involved and people who are vain sticking lovely dead animals on their walls.”

 

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In America, Donald Trump has previously spoken out against big-game trophy hunting despite Donald Trump Jr being a keen hunter. A week-long “dream hunt” with the US president’s son was auctioned off earlier this month at an annual trophy hunting convention organised by Safari Club International (SCI), where it went for $150,000. Another lot offered the chance to shoot an elephant on a 14-day trip to Namibia.

Supporters of trophy hunting such as SCI argue that the practise supports conservation efforts for endangered wildlife. The organisation said it had written to the governments of Botswana, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe in relation to the proposed trophy hunting import ban in the UK.

When contacted by the Guardian about the trophy hunting consultation that ends on 25 February, a Defra spokesperson said: “Following the pre-election and Christmas periods, we are extending the trophy hunting consultation by one month to ensure all interested parties are able to have their say.”

Find more age of extinction coverage here, and follow biodiversity reporters Phoebe Weston and Patrick Greenfield on Twitter for all the latest news and features

 

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Sir Ranulph Twisleton-Wykeham-Fiennes, 3rd Baronet, OBE (born 7 March 1944), commonly known as Ranulph Fiennes (/ˈrænʌlf ˈfaɪnz/), and sometimes as Ran Fiennes, is a British explorer and holder of several endurance records. He is also a writer, poet and co-creator of Sir Ranulph Fiennes’ Great British Rum.

Fiennes served in the British Army for eight years, including a period on counter-insurgency service while attached to the Army of the Sultanate of Oman. He later undertook numerous expeditions and was the first person to visit both the North and South Poles by surface means and the first to completely cross Antarctica on foot. In May 2009, at the age of 65, he climbed to the summit of Mount Everest.

According to the Guinness Book of World Records in 1984, he was the world’s greatest living explorer. Fiennes has written numerous books about his army service and his expeditions as well as a book defending Robert Falcon Scott from modern revisionists.

 

Germany: Executions of wolves approved

 

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After more than 150 years we have free wolves in the Federal Republic again! The wolf, which was exterminated in Germany and persecuted for centuries, was allowed to return.
If we leave the animals in peace, they will stay with us and will be of great benefit to us.

However, the hunters have a huge lobby, are represented in large numbers in the German Parliament and are best fraternized with the agricultural lobby. Both hunters and animal farm keepers demand that the wolf be shot.
And they did it! Farmers and hunters were able to prevail again.

Wolf Bilder Zum Ausdrucken Fd32 Messianica Malvorlagen Für Mädchen with Wolfsbilder Zum Ausdrucken

Last week, the Federal Council approved the law, with passed by the german parliament in December 2019 from the Environment Minister Svenja Schulze (SPD, Social Democratic Party).
According to this law, wolves can be shot in the future if “serious damage” has been caused to livestock farmers, and even if it is not found lets which wolf attacked or killed the “farm animal”.
The wolf should be included in hunting law.

Even in the future, it will be permitted to shoot wolves in the affected area until attacks on herds or individual animals stop – even if an entire rudder thus eliminated.

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The extinction of this species is only a matter of time, because the protection of an endangered species is sacrificed for the economic interests of farmers, herd owners and hunters.

But the nicest thing is coming:
Lower Saxony’s state hunting community welcomes the new shooting rules for wolves decided by the Federal Council. “They are a step towards simplifying the removal of these animals”, said President Helmut Dammann!

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“There is finally legal certainty for hunters who shoot a wolf from a problematic pack”, Dammann said.

However, he demands that the hunters remain anonymous (!!!) This is the only way to protect them from attacks by radical animal rights activists.

If a hunter killed a wolf, “then he will pack that wolf in a vehicle and place it on the verge of a busy road, where the wolf will be found relatively quickly.”

Wolf auf einen Wage geladen

https://www.ndr.de/nachrichten/niedersachsen/Abschuss-von-Woelfen-Jaeger-wollen-anonym-bleiben,wolf4260.html

 

My comment: Shoot? I call it murder. That would be a license for every hunter to shoot wolves.
That is the aim of the hunters, to shoot the wolves free … nothing else.
They are really criminal, insane killers.

In 2018, 2,067 “livestock” animals were torn from wolves.
1,656 sheep fell victim to the wolves due to poor pasture security.
In 2018, 771 million farm animals died in our slaughterhouses.
23,257 living beings were sheep and lambs.

schönes Zitat für Osterlämmer“The greatest danger to lambs is not the wolf, but Easter”

 

Since sighting the first wolves in Germany, 1.1 million euros have been compensated for them.
In 2016 there was 682 million compensation for traffic accidents with game.
Is it still safe for us in our forests?
Approximately 40 deaths from hunting weapons in Germany each year.
The number of deads people by wolves in Germany is zero, since they returned in our forests.

There are no problem wolves, there are only problem people. Due to the massive increase in population expansion, the wolf’s natural habitat is being taken away.
(The “favorable state of conservation of the wolf” has not yet been reached“EU Commissioner Vella”).

And now the killers are demanding anonymity when they kill animals!

Hunters first shout that the wolf needs to be hunted, and now they’re too cowardly to show they shot the wolf? Then they can’t even boast if they shot a wolf and hang their heads on the wall as a trophy !! Then why do they want to shoot wolves at all ?!

It’s not just murder, it’s a cowardly murder!

Dear politicians, legislators and other responsible parties!  You have be send to your home, to mama or collect stamps, you are not good for more!
What disgrace is it for a nation and its inhabitans that allows the cruel picture of wolves, who are lying dead all around the street?
Poor wolfs: it’s an injustice that you don’t get the right to hunt hunters or similar people.

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My best regards to all, Venus

15/2 Is World Pangolin Day – Learn More About These Wonderful Animals – Now Critically Endangered Due To Man.

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Yesterday, 15/2 was World Pangolin Day.

 

Pangolin Day

 

Here we want to share a little more about these wonderful animals who, thanks to man; are either listed as vulnerable, endangered or critically endangered.

 

World Pangolin Day is an opportunity for pangolin enthusiasts to join together in raising awareness about these unique mammals — and their plight. Pangolin numbers are rapidly declining in Asia and Africa.

The demand for pangolins comes mostly from China, where pangolin scales are unfortunately believed to be a cure-all of sorts and pangolin flesh is considered a delicacy. In Vietnam, pangolins are frequently offered at restaurants catering to wealthy patrons who want to eat rare and endangered wildlife. There is no evidence to support claims regarding medicinal properties of pangolin scales or any other part of the pangolin.

Connect, get updates and share ideas for #worldpangolinday at facebook.com/WorldPangolinDay

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The following is with thanks to Wikipedia:

Pangolins or scaly anteaters[2] are mammals of the order Pholidota (from the Greek word φολῐ́ς, “horny scale”). The one extant family, Manidae, has three genera: Manis, which comprises four species living in Asia; Phataginus, which comprises two species living in Africa; and Smutsia, which comprises two species also living in Africa.[3] These species range in size from 30 to 100 cm (12 to 39 in). A number of extinct pangolin species are also known.

Pangolins have large, protective keratin scales covering their skin; they are the only known mammals with this feature. They live in hollow trees or burrows, depending on the species. Pangolins are nocturnal, and their diet consists of mainly ants and termites, which they capture using their long tongues. They tend to be solitary animals, meeting only to mate and produce a litter of one to three offspring, which are raised for about two years.

Pangolins are threatened by poaching (for their meat and scales) and heavy deforestation of their natural habitats, and are the most trafficked mammals in the world.[4] As of January 2020[update], of the eight species of pangolin, three (Manis culionensis, M. pentadactyla and M. javanica) are listed as critically endangered, three (Phataginus tricuspis, Manis crassicaudata and Smutsia gigantea) are listed as endangered and two (Phataginus tetradactyla and Smutsia temminckii) are listed as vulnerable on the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List of Threatened Species.

 

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The physical appearance of a pangolin is marked by large hardened overlapping plate-like scales, which are soft on newborn pangolins, but harden as the animal matures. They are made of keratin, the same material from which human fingernails and tetrapod claws are made, and are structurally and compositionally very different from the scales of reptiles. The pangolin’s scaled body is comparable in appearance to a pine cone. It can curl up into a ball when threatened, with its overlapping scales acting as armor, while it protects its face by tucking it under its tail. The scales are sharp, providing extra defense from predators.

Pangolins can emit a noxious-smelling chemical from glands near the anus, similar to the spray of a skunk. They have short legs, with sharp claws which they use for burrowing into ant and termite mounds and for climbing.

The tongues of pangolins are extremely long and – like those of the giant anteater and the tube-lipped nectar bat – the root of the tongue is not attached to the hyoid bone, but is in the thorax between the sternum and the trachea. Large pangolins can extend their tongues as much as 40 cm (16 in), with a diameter of only 0.5 cm (0.20 inches.

Most pangolins are nocturnal animals which use their well-developed sense of smell to find insects. The long-tailed pangolin is also active by day, while other species of pangolins spend most of the daytime sleeping, curled up into a ball.

Arboreal pangolins live in hollow trees, whereas the ground-dwelling species dig tunnels to a depth of 3.5 m (11 ft).

Some pangolins walk with their front claws bent under the foot pad, although they use the entire foot pad on their rear limbs. Furthermore, some exhibit a bipedal stance for some behaviour and may walk a few steps bipedally. Pangolins are also good swimmers.

 

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Pangolins are insectivorous. Most of their diet consists of various species of ants and termites and may be supplemented by other insects, especially larvae. They are somewhat particular and tend to consume only one or two species of insects, even when many species are available to them. A pangolin can consume 140 to 200 g (4.9 to 7.1 oz) of insects per day. Pangolins are an important regulator of termite populations in their natural habitats.

Pangolins have very poor vision, so they rely heavily on smell and hearing. Pangolins also lack teeth; therefore they have evolved other physical characteristics to help them eat ants and termites. Their skeletal structure is sturdy and they have strong front legs that are useful for tearing into termite mounds. They use their powerful front claws to dig into trees, ground, and vegetation to find prey, then proceed to use their long tongues to probe inside the insect tunnels and to retrieve their prey.

The structure of their tongue and stomach is key to aiding pangolins in obtaining and digesting insects. Their saliva is sticky, causing ants and termites to stick to their long tongues when they are hunting through insect tunnels. Without teeth, pangolins also lack the ability to chew; however, while foraging, they ingest small stones (gastroliths) which accumulate in their stomachs to help to grind up ants. This part of their stomach is called the gizzard, and it is also covered in keratinous spines. These spines further aid in the grinding up and digestion of the pangolin’s prey.

Some species, such as the tree pangolin, use their strong, prehensile tails to hang from tree branches and strip away bark from the trunk, exposing insect nests inside.

 

Threats to this wonderful little animal

Pangolins are in high demand for Chinese traditional medicine in southern China and Vietnam because their scales are Pangolins are in high demand for Chinese traditional medicine in southern China and Vietnam because their scales are believed to have medicinal properties. Their meat is also considered a delicacy. 100,000 are estimated to be trafficked a year to China and Vietnam, amounting to over one million over the past decade. This makes it the most trafficked animal in the world.  This, coupled with deforestation, has led to a large decrease in the numbers of pangolins. Some species, such as Manis pentadactyla have become commercially extinct in certain ranges as a result of overhunting In November 2010, pangolins were added to the Zoological Society of London‘s list of evolutionarily distinct and endangered mammals.  All eight species of pangolin are assessed as threatened by the IUCN, while three are classified as critically endangered. All pangolin species are currently listed under Appendix I of CITES which prohibits international trade, except when the product is intended for non-commercial purposes and a permit has been granted.

Pangolins are also hunted and eaten in many parts of Africa and are one of the more popular types of bush meat, while local healers use the pangolin as a source of traditional medicine.

 

Though pangolins are protected by an international ban on their trade, populations have suffered from illegal trafficking due to beliefs in East Asia that their ground-up scales can stimulate lactation or cure cancer or asthma. In the past decade, numerous seizures of illegally trafficked pangolin and pangolin meat have taken place in Asia.  In one such incident in April 2013, 10,000 kg (11 short tons) of pangolin meat were seized from a Chinese vessel that ran aground in the Philippines. In another case in August 2016, an Indonesian man was arrested after police raided his home and found over 650 pangolins in freezers on his property. The same threat is reported in many countries in Africa, especially Nigeria, where the animal is on the verge of extinction due to overexploitation. The overexploitation comes from hunting pangolins for game meat and the reduction of their forest habitats due to deforestation caused by timber harvesting. The pangolin are hunted as game meat for both medicinal purposes and food consumption.

 

Man, as with everything; the ‘intelligent’ destroyer of everything that lives in this world !

 

 

Australia: Psychopaths at work

 

Many Australians are unaware of the disgraceful way in which wild pigs are being killed throughout New South Wales and Queensland

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Pig dogging is a shamefully cruel and barbaric practice in which dogs are forced to hunt wild pigs. While hunters boast grotesquely of the adrenaline rush they experience, their treatment of the victims of this “sport” – both pigs and dogs – is deplorable.

The dogs are encouraged to chase and tire out the pigs and then hold them by the ears until a human arrives to kill them. Pigs who are chased, trapped, and killed in this way experience intense fear and distress.

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Usually, hunters kill pigs by “sticking” them – stabbing them in the stomach or chest to puncture the heart – before leaving them to bleed out in a prolonged and painful death.

Because these hunts cover large areas and it’s difficult for hunters to maintain contact with their dogs, pigs are often mauled for long periods and even killed before the humans arrive on the scene. In many cases, hunters actually encourage their dogs to maul the pigs.

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The dogs are usually large mixed-breed ones who’ve been “blooded” to make them especially aggressive. They may be beaten, starved, and psychologically abused in order to “train” them not to retreat from a pig 10 times their size.

After enduring this trauma, they’re then exposed to extreme danger during the hunt. Even though they may be “armoured” – wearing protective throat collars, breastplates, and vests – they’re often injured, mutilated, and killed.

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Legislation relating to pig dogging differs from state to state, but it’s virtually impossible to take part in this blood sport without seriously compromising the intentions and regulations of the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act 1979 and the Companion Animals Act 1998.

Write to the New South Wales and Queensland state governments and ask that they take action on this important issue.

Please sign the petition:https://secure.peta.org.au/page/48616/action/1

Here is another petition on the subject, please sign: https://www.animalsaustralia.org/take_action/stop-pig-dogging/

 

And I mean...The same thing happens with the “training” of dogs against foxes in Germany.
In Spain the galgos are also trained to death either for hunting the rabbits or for competition.
And in Eastern countries, dogfighting is booming, as we recently reported.
https://worldanimalsvoice.com/2020/02/02/kosovo-dog-fighting-as-an-organized-crime/

Everything takes place with the support or tolerance of corrupt politicians.
From psychopaths who sit in important positions and decide about lucrative business with animals.
But it is not an argument not to publish any criminal acts because they happen everywhere.
Wherever they happen, we will publicize them and ask for help.
Because the animals have just us.

My best regards to all, Venus