Category: General News

An Everyday Guide to Vegan Foods – Its Not Just Nut Cutlets Now !

The following is reason enough to go Vegan;

 

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https://www.vegan.com/foods/

 

If you want to discover great new vegan foods you can add to your diet, you’ve come to the right place.

This page offers a comprehensive assortment of links to every imaginable sort of vegan food. But depending on what you’re looking for, you might actually be more interested in our vegan cooking guide, our vegan grocery shopping list, or our handy collection of the best vegan foods sold by Amazon.com.

Note that the below list can feel overwhelming since it covers every single food-related page on Vegan.com. In case you’re looking for the quickest and most convenient possibilities, we have a separate page devoted entirely to easy vegan foods.

KEY LINKS

The quickest way to discover all the great things vegans can eat is to click through to each of the following five pages. The variety of fantastic vegan options is truly staggering.

 

VEGAN COOKING

VEGAN MEATS & FISH

VEGAN MILK & DAIRY

ALL OTHER VEGAN FOODS

 

Now that you’ve looked over all these foods, why not get cooking? Check out our Guide to Vegan Cookingand our listing of the best recent vegan cookbooks. If you’re new to vegan foods, you may also find our “How to Go Vegan” page of interest.

 

 

 

 

Get well very soon Brian; you are needed in animal rights (and music !):

 

 

Filthy ‘Wet Markets’ Still Peddling Animals and Flesh Despite COVID-19 – WHO and World Governments Do Nothing to Resolve A World Issue !

 

 

 

Hi Mark,

After releasing footage taken inside “wet markets” in Indonesia and Thailand in early April – months after the COVID-19 outbreak began – PETA Asia investigators observed more filth, misery, and death at nearly a dozen other animal markets elsewhere in Asia.

At one market, the flesh of wild boars, snakes, dogs, and rats was sold openly, and even cats were slated for slaughter – huddled together, terrified and exhausted, in a crowded, dirty cage.

Since PETA released the initial footage in April, more than 200,000 people have joined PETA and our affiliates in urging the World Health Organization (WHO) to call for an end to deadly live-animal markets around the globe. More than 60 bipartisan congressional lawmakers followed in our footsteps, too, writing their own, similar letter to WHO urging the agency to request the closure of all such markets immediately. And as hundreds of thousands of human lives have already been claimed by COVID-19, it’s more critical than ever that we all take action.

Please join us in urging the World Health Organization to call for an end to live-animal meat markets.

Thanks for all you do for animals.

Sincerely,

Simon P-H
PETA UK

 

After releasing footage taken inside “wet markets” (also called “live-animal markets”) in Indonesia and Thailand in early April—months after the COVID-19 outbreak began—PETA Asia investigators observed more filth, misery, and death at nearly a dozen other animal markets elsewhere in Asia. Despite a growing death toll, calls by world leaders for a ban on such markets, and the continued importance of flattening the curve, they and others like them are still conducting business as usual.

These Live-Animal Markets Could Be Where the Next Pandemic Originates

This new footage, shot just days ago, takes viewers inside live-animal markets in Cambodia, China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam, where chickens, ducks, fish, and dogs as well as bats, monkeys, and other exotic animals are sold. 

Terrified live animals, bloody carcasses, and rotting flesh were all being peddled for human consumption. At multiple sites, investigators observed marketgoers walking around in flip-flops on floors covered with bodily fluids and handling raw flesh and touching blood-streaked countertops with their bare hands. At two other markets, civet cats and bats were sold for food—even though they’re a reservoir species for severe acute respiratory syndrome (commonly known as SARS), another deadly coronavirus.

Blood and Rotting Flesh Everywhere

Weeks before, PETA Asia investigators had visited wet markets in Indonesia and Thailand and were shocked even back then that any were still operating. At the Tomohon Market in Indonesia, the flesh of wild boars, snakes, dogs, and rats (whose babies like to put their arms around their mother’s neck while being bathed) were openly sold at the market. Gloveless workers and customers were seen handling the body parts of animals who had been killed on site. A mutilated snake was curled up on a table, blood staining the white tiles red. Chickens with open wounds were bound to other birds slated for slaughter.

 

Enough Is Enough

All wet markets are potential breeding grounds for zoonotic diseases, such as COVID-19, SARS, and MERS. At such markets, feces and other bodily fluids can easily get on traders’ and customers’ shoes and be tracked into restaurants and homes. The workers who handle the animals often don’t wear gloves (as seen in the video footage) and can also spread bacteria. Flies swarm around the bodies of dead pigs and other animals, and the countertops and floors are streaked red with the blood of gutted fish and slaughtered animals.

PETA Asia has written to health officials in Cambodia, China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam to call for an end to deadly live-animal markets.

Shutting down foreign wet markets isn’t good enough. To prevent more diseases like COVID-19, we must do more than crack down on these markets only in certain areas of the world. All live-animal markets must go.

Live Birds Caged With Their Dead Companions

Live ducks and chickens (who have their own unique language, with more than 30 different sounds) were kept in cramped, filthy cages, sometimes with the bodies of birds who’d already been purchased and killed. Live turtles (some of whom can hold their breath under water for over 100 days) and other “exotic” sea animals were also available for purchase. Like all animals, they just want to be left in peace, not killed for food.

 

 

Suffering and Death in a Thai ‘Wet Market’

At Bangkok’s Khlong Toei Market, PETA Asia’s investigator saw mesh bags jam-packed with live, frightened frogs (some of whom use trees as “drums” to send messages to one another) being plunked down next to the mutilated bodies of other slaughtered frogs.

Cats Are Caged and Sold for Meat, Too

Terrified, exhausted cats—sensitive and intelligent, just like the cats we share our hearts and homes with—were kept in a crowded, dirty cage without food or water until they were purchased for their flesh.

 

 

TAKE ACTION:

 

Help Prevent the Next Global Pandemic: Take Action Now!

Take Action Link:

https://secure.peta.org.uk/page/60272/action/1?utm_source=PETA%20UK::E-Mail&utm_medium=Alert&utm_campaign=0520::veg::PETA%20UK::E-Mail::Asian%20Wet%20Markets::::aa%20em&ea.url.id=4740277&forwarded=true#action

 

 

Animal hoarding: what’s this?

 

Animal hoarding describes the morbid addiction to collecting animals – a widespread phenomenon not only in Germany.

People who hoard a large number of animals in this form usually cause terrible animal suffering: they often do not provide food, adequate hygiene, and veterinary care. Again and again, countless animals have to be saved from terrible circumstances in which they lived with animal collectors.

Animal-Hoarding-PETA-D1

What is animal hoarding?

Animal Hoarders are mostly not aware of the suffering they cause to the animals in their care – even if it seems obvious to other observers. The animal collectors are also characterized by the following striking behaviors:

-They collect a large number of animals, often kept in too little space.
-They don’t care about the most basic needs of animals, such as freshwater, feed, shelter, veterinary care, and hygiene.
-They make excuses or deny the miserable conditions under which their animals – and other people in the household – have to live.

Even if the well-being of oneself or other family members are endangered, the people affected usually no longer respond.

animal hoarding c-PETA-DPETA, Germany

 

“It is often a process that develops over a long period of time. The keepers are increasingly losing track of animal husbandry. At some point in the stables, apartments, and barns you will find critically ill or dead animals “-says Jana Hoger, a specialist at PETA.

Continue reading “Animal hoarding: what’s this?”

England: Coronavirus: the danger of live animal export.

Sheep legs

 

https://theecologist.org/2020/may/27/coronavirus-danger-live-animal-export

 

Coronavirus: the danger of live animal export

Abigail Penny

 

27th May 2020

As society shifted from liberty to lockdown, life as we know it changed. This global crisis warrants a global response and that’s what we’re giving it… or are we?

We’ve seen schools close and pop-up hospitals open. As planes sat idle, airlines sought bailouts. Anti-bac became our everyday elixir. We’re now living a life full of hand-sewn face-masks, never-ending Zoom calls and supermarket home-deliveries.

In France police patrol the streets checking people’s permits to stroll outside. In Spain some residents resorted to walking toy dogs in an attempt to dodge imposed restrictions. And finally, after two long months of strict lockdown measures, Italy has taken a collective deep breath of fresh air.

So, as we battle this deadly pandemic, it’s only right that ‘Stay Home, Save Lives’ became our quarantine mantra.

 

Journeys

As many of us keep safe inside, farmed animals continue to roam — though they too are not free. With a one-way ticket to an international destination of the industry’s choice, they are shipped great distances for ‘fattening’ and butchery.

Earlier this month Animal Equality’s team in Spain released heart-breaking scenes of disorientated young lambs and sheep crammed into trucks and ships.

Forced to travel many miles from where they were born, footage showed them in small metal pens, their hooves caught between the bars and their journeys lasting for days or even weeks. Some are pregnant or become injured along the way; most endure extreme temperatures with little food, water or rest; all are unaware of the chilling fate that awaits them.

Last month animal protection organisations, Eyes on Animals and L214, released undercover footage of calves from Ireland transported on long journeys to France for veal, where they were callously kicked and beaten with sticks.

And just a fortnight ago coverage of a newly published European Commission report highlighted that the welfare of millions of animals exported from the EU is being put at risk by failings, “including heat stress, bad planning and a lack of information from the destination country”.

Here in the UK thousands of live sheep, calves, pigs and even horses continue to be exported to countries in the EU and beyond. The cliffs of Dover are witness to lambs on their way to slaughter.

 

Disease

So, why one rule for the animal agriculture industry and another for the rest of us?

A particularly poignant question at a time when researchers are suggesting that the consumption of animal products may be linked to the coronavirus crisis and when science tells us that 75 percent of new and emerging infectious diseases in people come from animals.

Forcing animals to live in intensive conditions, travel great lengths in restless confinement and suffer a merciless death leaves us in a more precarious position than ever before.

Vets and epidemiologists keep sounding the alarm that live animal export significantly increases the likelihood of diseases to spread; coronavirus knows no borders. The animal agriculture industry is making a mockery of everyone’s social distancing efforts and putting us all in grave danger.

Live export is certainly not necessary on animal welfare grounds, nor for reasons of public safety, so why exactly is this practice still permitted in the current health crisis?

As I write, animals are struggling in overcrowded lorries and ships, stuck in even longer queues than usual as COVID-19 further disrupts transport links. We cast-off these blameless animals with no controls in place for how they are to live or die: once they depart British soil, they may as well already be dead to us.

 

 

Profits

Workers too are in imminent danger. Truckers, vessel crews, animal handlers and others are all in close proximity with these frightened animals and will be amongst the first to catch any deadly pathogens that lurk. No one should be forced to be at risk just to make a living.

Though can we really be all that surprised that the meat industry is prioritising profits over people?

Weeks ago we saw workers stage a walkout of a poultry plant operated by Moy Park — one of the UK’s largest chicken producers, responsible for raising and slaughtering over 312 million birds here each year — due to fears over lack of PPE and inadequate measures to combat the spread of coronavirus.

And stories from slaughterhouses and meat packing facilities continue to dominate our screens, with coronavirus cases especially prevalent in abattoirs throughout the US and Ireland. This from an industry that prides itself on ever-increasing ‘kill line’ speeds, where workers are typically in close proximity and made to work as quickly as possible, all to maximise profits.

 

 

Inaction

Worldwide, an estimated two billion live animals are transported long distances each year. Since we went into lockdown in the UK on 23rd March, over 350 million live animals have been exported around the world. The numbers are staggering… the risk to us all equally so.

Boris himself has spoken out in the past in favour of a ban, claiming that by “abolishing the cruel live shipment of animals” the UK can demonstrate that “we will be able to do things differently” post-Brexit.

Despite this, no legislation has been put in place. Animal Equality is among many animal protection groups calling for action, including Compassion in World Farming, Eurogroup for Animals, KAALE and more.

The export of live animals poses a serious threat to humans and animals and now, more than ever before, we cannot afford the further spread of disease. The Government must end live animal exports.

 

 

This Author

Abigail Penny is executive director for Animal Equality. Animal Equality will be joining Compassion in World Farming’s global twitterstorm on 14 June 2020 to raise awareness of this issue and to signal to policymakers that this cruel practice must end now. Learn more from its website.

 

USA: Nationwide Slaughter Free City Discussions – Get Involved 28/5/20 – See Below.

american-flag-120402148

 

 

 

 

Dear Friends,                                                                                

I want to urge you to register ASAP for this important webinar tomorrow, Thursday 5/28. There are over 80 slaughterhouses in NYC but they exist in every major city in the US and Canada. As a result of the pandemic of Covid-19, the WHO has urged the closing of all wet markets and there is a nationwide SlaughterFreeCity movement in response. You are sure to find this webinar of great interest…and it is open to all; so please share with associates and on social media!

All the best,

Zelda

 

 

Dear Friends,

My name is Tamara Bedic. I am the co-Vice President of the National Lawyers Guild (NYC) and Chair of its Animal Rights committee.

Although our Animal Rights committee used to meet in person, COVID-19 changed all that, and we’re now meeting online and inviting all activists and interested parties to join us.

I hosted our first online meeting in April called: ‘Wuhan, Wet Markets & Wildlife’. Our speaker was renowned Sino-American wildlife expert and animal activist Prof. Peter Li of Houston University. We concluded that webinar with comments by Assemblymember Rosenthal, who subsequently went on to draft a bill to close New York’s 80+ slaughterhouses, an essential step in ridding our neighborhoods of these disease-ridden, inhumane, wet-markets.

The poll that immediately followed April’s webinar asked attendees to choose a follow-up topic of preferred interest. “New York’s slaughterhouses” was by far the issue on every one’s mind; it won the poll by a landslide.

Bill A10399 / S08291 came into being around May 4th, but the clock is ticking on the session calendar.  Meanwhile, the slaughterhouses are operating as ‘essential businesses’, despite having accumulated (in some cases) dozens of violations (as our FOIA requests bear witness). 

So as you see, lots to analyze and discuss at the next meeting. Helping us along are:

•Prof. Ethan Taylor of Univ. of North Carolina, researcher in emerging zoonotic viral infections;   https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Ethan_Taylor2

•Gail Eisnitz, Chief Investigator and author of “Slaughterhouse.”  https://unboundproject.org/gail-eisnitz/

•Assemblymember Linda Rosenthal, Sponsor of New York’s A10399; and

•New York State Senator Luis Sepúlveda, Sponsor of parallel bill, S08291.

I welcome you to join our webinar on Thursday, May 28th, at noon, (Eastern time).

The invite link is below.

Cheers and thank you!

Tamara

 

https://wetmarket.eventbrite.com

 

 

England: Trophy Hunters Exposed – Inside the Big Game Industry. Lifting the Lid On Psycho Animal Hunters.

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https://worldanimalsvoice.com/?s=trophy+hunter 

 

alternative cover3a

 

“If this book doesn’t get trophy hunting banned I don’t know what will. This is an incredible investigation that reveals everything the industry would rather you didn’t know.” – JUDI DENCH

“A society which allows sentient creatures to be killed for entertainment has serious questions to answer. ‘Trophy Hunters Exposed’ asks those questions and then answers them in devastating fashion.” PETER EGAN

“If there’s one book to buy about animals this year, this is it. Trophy hunting is legalised animal abuse on an industrial scale. ‘Trophy Hunters Exposed’ tells us why we must abolish it. Now.” – JOANNA LUMLEY

 

Thousands of animals threatened with extinction were shot by trophy hunters last year. Attempts to protect dwindling lion and elephant populations have been thwarted by hunters. They are now allowed to shoot twice as many critically endangered black rhinos. How has this happened?

‘TROPHY HUNTERS EXPOSED – Inside the Big Game Industry’ is an explosive investigation into the trophy hunting industry, its key players and donors, and how it is stripping endangered animals of the protections they need.

It reveals how a top fundraiser for Donald Trump, Vladimir Putin’s right-hand man, the head of a paramilitary death-squad and a former WWF Director have shot record-breaking lions, elephants, rhinos and leopards.

It exposes the identities of over 500 hunters who have won industry awards for shooting all the ‘African Big Five’; the leading figures in the UK industry including a salesman who helps hunters shoot juvenile lions in enclosures; and the extraordinary kill tallies and trophy collections of hunters around the world.

It also lifts the lid on how household brands – and our taxes – are funding lobbyists, how the Boy Scouts and Salvation Army in the US are helping the industry recruit a new generation of child hunters, how lobbyists are posing as ‘conservation’ groups … and how the industry boasts it ploughs more money into US elections than some of the world’s biggest corporations.

Read how psychologists and criminologists fear trophy hunting could be fuelling violent crime, and how the industry could spark devastating outbreaks of diseases in local communities …

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Eduardo Goncalves is an award-winning campaigner, journalist and conservationist. He has been a consultant to WWF and CEO of a national animal welfare charity. In 2018, he founded the Campaign to Ban Trophy Hunting, which is today supported by some of the world’s biggest names in music, sport, film and TV. In 2019, the Campaign to Ban Trophy Hunting persuaded the UK government to support a ban on imports of hunting trophies.

Eduardo was awarded the Animal Heroes Award for services to wildlife in 2019. A short film about Eduardo’s work – with endorsements from Kevin Pietersen, Stanley Johnson, Lorraine Kelly, Sir Ranulph Fiennes and Daily Mirror editor Alison Phillips – can be viewed HERE.

Proceeds from the sale of ‘TROPHY HUNTERS EXPOSED – Inside the Big Game Industry’ will be donated to the Campaign to Ban Trophy Hunting

 

BOOK REVIEW

by Charlie Moores, War on Wildlife

The Daily Mail has described Eduardo Goncalves, founder of the Campaign to Ban Trophy Hunting (CBTH) as “Britain’s most prominent anti-hunting activist”. Whether they mean that as a compliment is difficult to tell, but it does show just how busy Eduardo has been given that he only set up CBTH two years ago. Prior to that he was chief-executive of the League Against Cruel Sports of course (which, not that disclaimers are needed, is where I first met him), but Eduardo – it seems – has indeed become one of the most recognisable faces and voices in a movement arrowing in on one of the most cruel, wasteful, and disturbing examples of humanity’s war on wildlife.

In a remarkably short time Eduardo (who is seemingly everywhere and knows everyone) has brought together a broad coalition of supporters and researchers, become an almost permanent fixture in the media, and – it turns out – has also somehow found time to write a book. Or at least, written the sort of minutely-detailed, reference-packed work that an organisation like Ethical Consumer might produce if they were to write a book. Stripped of anything superfluous, of anything subjective or gratuitous (there are no images – can you imagine the hunters writing their manual without including selfies of dentists with dead lions?), “Trophy Hunters Exposed: Inside the Big Game Industry” slams into trophy hunting with the force of a meteorite.

Published today and presented in three parts, ‘THE’ precisely dissects the Industry (“one of the world’s most powerful political lobbies”), dispassionately lists the worst of the world’s self-glorifying hunters, before finally detailing exactly why these apparently sexually inadequate, delusional, ‘freedom fighters’ only feel alive when they’re killing something (in the name of ‘conservation’ of course). It’s all done so forensically. Fact after fact delivered like charges in an indictment. Page after page of condemnation of an industry that shouldn’t exist, that is built from an alt-right shopping list of God, money, gun rights, and machismo, a skewed eighteenth-century vision of white men sorting out the wilderness, and a biblical ‘dominion’ belief that animals are just there for us to do what we want with.

Eduardo doesn’t go in for such rhetorical flourish though, and ‘THE’ is all the better for it. There is a noticeable absence of opinion or personal pronouns. It is in essence a distillation of factual material, minutely researched and referenced, that brings together absolutely every good argument against trophy hunting. Trophy hunting’s proponents will seize on that last point as the book is unconcerned with presenting any of what they would see as the good arguments for trophy hunting. But, I would hazard a guess, that was never the intention. Eduardo’s response might be to point out that the industry has had years to lobby, obfuscate, blur, and lie, so why should he give their arguments (which revolve almost entirely around land-use) another airing, but I think it’s more likely that he simply neither respects nor agrees with any of them.

And why should he? Anything trophy hunters might trot out about respect for wildlife, local people, or conservation is undermined by their own words and actions. While ‘THE’ is not filled with what Eduardo thinks, feels, or has experienced, it does collate the most apposite quotations of others. There are damning lines picked from, for example, hunting forums, from unguarded discussions at hunting shows, and from the tone-deaf posturings of hunters on social media. There is an enormous amount of material in the public domain. Much of it no doubt resonates with fellow psychopaths, but to the rest of us it is just revealing. From glorifying trophy rooms (external representations of an individual’s total lack of empathy with the natural world) to organ-swelling gun porn (“…[the gazelle] swayed back and forth a bit and then turned and I saw the blood pouring out of his nose”), the appalling world of treating sentient life as the urinal wall in a pissing contest is laid bare.

Will ‘THE’ end trophy hunting? For all its gimlet-eyed focus on this ego-stroking ‘sport’, the answer is no, of course not. As the book details, heads of industry, the uber-wealthy, and sons of presidents and royalty fill voids in their lives by blasting holes in animals. Hunting has shored itself up with vast bank accounts, infiltrated legislature and conservation organsations, and is now chasing children to ensure the flow of emotionally-stunted gunmen doesn’t dry up. It sells itself as freedom, and uses an image of masculinity that appeals to a primal desire to slaughter that many of us acknowledge but have turned away from in disgust. More than all of that, it is about making profit. Corrupt officials have made absolute fortunes selling wildlife to the vainglorious. Trophy hunting will not simply lie down and go away, but much like how Dr Mark Avery’s ‘Inglorious’ stripped away the veneer of tradition and glamour that the grouse industry had wrapped itself in, “Trophy Hunters Exposed: Inside the Big Game Industry” does exactly what it sets out to do: expose, strip bare, shine a light that trophy hunting will at first sneer at but – as the evidence piles up – will ultimately be desperate to shrink away from.

Another question might be, where does ‘Trophy Hunting Exposed’ sit in our post-Covid world? Is it a perfect post-Covid book, arriving bang on time as we seek to re-examine our relationship with the environment and with nature? I don’t think so. Not because ‘THE’ is not an invaluable resource or primer par excellence (it definitely is), but because none of what ‘THE’ exposes is made worse by global pandemic. We already knew that habitat and biodiversity loss was destroying nature, that we’re emptying the planet of large mammals (especially large carnivores), and that unregulated trophy hunting (and Eduardo has plenty to say about CITES incidentally) is slashing-and-burning its way through whole populations of supposedly protected wildlife. Trophy hunting was horrible and self-serving long before the virus emerged, and the seeds of this book were surely planted almost as soon as Eduardo began gathering his facts and statistics for the launch of CBTH. There was simply so much damning material that it had to go somewhere, and a book that all of us can use as a reference or guide to silence or infuriate trophy hunters is the logical format.

Like all campaigns that tackle such complex issues it will take a huge, multi-agency effort to end trophy hunting, but those of us that love wildlife should be incredibly grateful that there are campaigners like Eduardo Goncalves prepared to stand so visibly on the front line. Genial and all smiles on the surface, he is like a human cruise missile, powered by cold fury and laser-locked on the appalling trophy hunting industry. I suspect the industry hates him. Which is perhaps reason enough to own ‘Trophy Hunters Exposed’, but more importantly it’s all the information you need to marshal your thoughts, talk persuasively to your family and friends about trophy hunting, and to rebut the claims of pro hunters that they do no harm, love animals, and are true conservationists. It’s important to note, too, that any profits from ‘THE’ will go straight back into funding the work of the Campaign to Ban Trophy Hunting.

As stated above, no single book, no single effort, can stop something as embedded and well-financed as trophy hunting. But have no doubt that each barbed fact, each truth, each honest analysis will unpick the threads holding this disgusting edifice together and convince more and more of us that it is dishonest, untruthful, and bereft of legitimacy. And that – in the end – is how it will be brought down.

Charlie Moores – May 25, 2020

 

The video of Gorney, a retired energy company executive, is believed to have been recorded in Zimbabwe in 2011

In the video, Gorney fires one shot, and awakens the unsuspecting lion to meet its demise

In a 2015 interview, Gorney addressed violent reactions to trophy hunting by pointing out he can defend himself. Gorney is pictured with a hippopotamus that he killed

In the interview from 2015 with CBS, Gorney showed no remorse for his 'hunting' habit, which at that time included killing 70 big game animals, such as elephant, lion, leopard, rhino and buffalo. Gorney is pictured with a rhino that he killed

'The "why" is just the – I call it the adventure of it. Same reason Teddy Roosevelt did it,' Gorney said. 'I really like hunting elephants. They’re difficult to track down. They’re incredibly dangerous. The first elephant I got, I walked over 120 miles tracking elephants before I actually caught up to him and found him'

The hunter also appears to enjoy searching for prey - including moose and bear - closer to home, in North America, as well as the African bush where he bagged a sleeping lion

psychoville

 

 

 

If Only …..

trpohy hunter 1