Argentina: Lambs Skinned Alive At Patagonia Supplier. Warning – Bad Video !

Argentina

 

 

PETA’s international affiliates have documented cruelty to sheep at dozens of wool farms around the world, including in Argentina, where an eyewitness saw workers hack apart conscious lambs and start to skin some of them while they were still alive and kicking at a facility in the Ovis 21 network – Patagonia’s wool supplier at the time.

A gut-churning PETA video exposé reveals that life is hell for lambs and other sheep exploited for so-called “responsibly sourced” wool on so-called “sustainable” farms. A witness found workers in Argentina hacking into fully conscious lambs, starting to skin some of them while they were still alive and kicking, and otherwise mutilating, abusing, and neglecting lambs and sheep on farms in the Ovis 21 network—Patagonia’s wool supplier.

 

UPDATE:  Update: On August 17, 2015, after hearing from more than 50,000 people, Patagonia announced that it was dropping Ovis 21 as a supplier, but will continue to sell products made from wool.

 

Workers picked up gentle lambs and—while they were fully conscious—tied their legs together, plunged knives into their throats, and sawed through their necks. Blood poured from the wounds as they kicked with their only free leg. Workers then snapped their heads backwards, apparently trying to break their necks.

Even after all that, some of the lambs still managed to cry out and gasp.

Minutes later, some lambs were still alive and kicking when a worker drove a knife into their legs to start skinning them. Eventually, they were hacked apart. Their organs were carved out of their bodies and their severed heads dumped into a bloody tub.

All this happened in full view of other lambs. They were just feet away and cried out in what must have been terror and severe distress. Older sheep—used for their wool, then no longer wanted—were lined up, tackled, and dragged away to be shipped to slaughter.

 

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