Day: September 3, 2020

The Typhoon Maysak ensures justice

The ship was hired by Australasian Global Exports, based in Australia, to transport the cattle.
“Our thoughts and prayers also go with the ship’s officers, crew and other employees and their families,” said Australasian Global Exports.
Here one speaks of a tragedy and one means the 43 human persons of the occupation.

Now, after this accident, New Zealand’s Ministry of Primary Industries (MPI) has announced that New Zealand will TEMPORARILY stop live cattle transports.
He’s got a problem because it’s about human victims.

If the occupation had saved themselves, neither the minister nor the press would speak of a tragedy.
As was the case with similar tragedies in the past.

We remember the ship accident with “Queen Hind”- cattle truck in Midia, with the 14,000 sheep in autumn 2019.
The same transports,  over the same wrecks, are still going on, despite our protests, because: All crew members – 22 Syrian nationals – were rescued at that time!!
We notice again whose life counts.

We mourn for the animal victims of the Gulf Livestock 1.
Our sad thoughts are with the drowned animals.

There were several pregnant mothers on board who, according to the law, never had to be transported.
Soon these mothers would have a small family too, perhaps on the floating coffin of the Gulf Livestock 1, if they had to bring their babies on board in those 17 days under appalling conditions

Usually, in such cases, self the crew rescues first, but this time the Typhoon “Maysak” kept justice on board!

We are firmly convinced that if in the future a “Maysak” will more and more often decide the fate of people and animals in animal transports, animal transports will soon be abolished.

We will continue to fight the floating and moving coffins, now more than ever, and we believe that we will soon be able to do it.

My best regards to all, Venus

Gulf Livestock 1.

CREWS have a choice to sail – ANIMALS do NOT.

GULF LIVESTOCK 1, Livestock Carrier – Details and current position – IMO 9262883 MMSI 353947000 – VesselFinder

GULF LIVESTOCK 1 photo

The Gulf Livestock 1 is a 139m (450ft), Panamanian-flagged cargo vessel built in 2002

The vessel is owned by UAE shipowner Gulf Navigation and prior to conversion in 2012 was a 630 teu boxship.

IMO number9262883
Vessel NameGULF LIVESTOCK 1
Ship typeLivestock Carrier
FlagPanama
Homeport
Gross Tonnage11947
Summer Deadweight (t)8372
Length Overall (m)134
Beam (m)20
Draught (m)
Year of Built2002
 

History: Vessel Name Registered Owner Year

GULF LIVESTOCK 1
2019 RAHMEH
2015 CETUS J. Jungerhans
2012 DANA HOLLANDIA Jungerhans
2006 CETUS J. Jungerhans
2002 MAERSK WATERFORD Jungerhans    

Further Link::

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12361791

3/9/20 – Japan Live Export News. More – Appears Ship Has Sunk and 1 Crewmember Survives.

Cargo ship with 43 crew and nearly 6,000 cattle sank off Japan, survivor says | World news | The Guardian

The Gulf Livestock 1 is seen at Fremantle Harbour

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/sep/03/typhoon-maysak-ship-with-43-crew-and-nearly-6000-cattle-missing-off-japan

A cargo ship carrying 43 crew and nearly 6,000 cattle sank off Japan after reportedly losing an engine in rough seas caused by Typhoon Maysak, a survivor has said.

The Filipino crew member, named as Sareno Edvarodo, a 45-year-old chief officer, was rescued late on Wednesday after Japanese navy P-3C surveillance aircraft spotted him wearing a life vest and waving while bobbing in the water.

Cargo ship with 43 crew and nearly 6,000 cattle sank off Japan, survivor says | World news | The Guardian

The path of the Gulf Livestock 1 before it disappeared due to Typhoon Maysak near the island of Okinawa

Edvarodo, who was in good health, told rescuers the ship capsized before sinking, said Yuichiro Higashi, a spokesman for the Japanese coast guard’s regional headquarters conducting the search.

The Panamanian-registered vessel, called Gulf Livestock 1, sent the distress call from the East China Sea early on Wednesday, to the west of Amami Oshima Island in south-western Japan, Japanese public broadcaster NHK reported.

According to Edvarodo, the ship lost an engine before it was hit by a wave and capsized, a coastguard spokeswoman said.

Crew were instructed to put on lifejackets as the ship capsized, he said, adding that he had jumped into the water and had not seen any other members of the crew before he was rescued.

The crew comprises 39 Filipinos, two Australians and two New Zealanders, Kyodo news agency said.

The Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (Dfat) said it was in touch with the families of the two Australians on board.

“The Australian government is providing consular assistance to the families of two Australian crew members on board a cargo vessel reported missing in Japanese waters,” Dfat said.

The cause of the distress was not immediately known, but the weather was rough in the area due to Typhoon Maysak. Strong winds and torrential rain from the typhoon had initially hampered the search operation, but the weather has improved, Higashi said.

The vessel, owned by Gulf Navigation Holding based in the United Arab Emirates, departed Napier in New Zealand on 14 August with 5,867 cattle on board, New Zealand’s foreign ministry told Reuters.

The vessel was en route to the Port of Jingtang in Tangshan, China, with an estimated journey of approximately 17 days, it said.

New Zealand animal rights organisation SAFE said the tragedy demonstrated the risks of the live animal export trade.

“These cows should never have been at sea,” said campaigns manager Marianne Macdonald.

“This is a real crisis, and our thoughts are with the families of the 43 crew who are missing with the ship. But questions remain, including why this trade is allowed to continue.”

Typhoon Maysak had weakened to a tropical storm as it arrived off the east coast of North Korea on Thursday.

North Korean state TV showed flooding along the eastern coast but there were no immediate reports of casualties.

The country is vulnerable to natural disasters due to its poor infrastructure, with flooding in deforested mountains and hills a particular concern.

Earlier on Thursday, the typhoon had caused brought down trees and caused flooding in parts of South Korea, knocking out power to more than 270,000 homes and leaving at least one person dead.

Breaking 3/9/20: Livestock Transporter Ship Carrying 43 Crew and Almost 6,000 Cattle Missing in Typhoon Off Japan.

Reports say the Gulf Livestock 1 issued a distress signal at around 1:20 a.m. local time Wednesday (3/9/20) while around 115 miles west of Amami Oshima Island in southwestern Japan. … The ship is reported to be carrying 43 crew members.19 hours ago

The Japanese Coast Guard is searching for a livestock carrier with 43 crew members on board after a distress signal was sent from the vessel on Wednesday.

Reports say the Gulf Livestock 1 issued a distress signal at around 1:20 a.m. local time Wednesday while around 115 miles west of Amami Oshima Island in southwestern Japan.

The ship is reported to be carrying 43 crew members.

The search is being conducted in the general vicinity of Typhoon Maysak, which was last reported to be packing 130 mph winds, equivalent to a Category 4 hurricane.

The Gulf Livestock 1 was reportedly transporting cattle from Napier, New Zealand to Tangshan, China. The vessel was built in 2002 and registered in Panama. It is owned by Dubai-based Gulf Navigation.

In late July, the Philippine Navy rendered assistance to the Gulf Livestock 1 after it lost propulsion off Balut Island in Southern Philippines. Repairs were eventually completed without incident.

Ship carrying 43 crew and almost 6,000 cattle missing in typhoon off Japan

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2020/09/03/national/freighter-missing-southwestern-japan/

A ship carrying 43 crew and nearly 6,000 cattle from New Zealand to China has capsized after losing an engine in stormy weather in the East China Sea, the only crew member rescued so far told the Japan Coast Guard (JCG) Thursday.

The Gulf Livestock 1 sent a distress call from west of Amami Oshima island Wednesday as Typhoon Maysak headed through the region towards the Korean peninsula, bringing strong winds, heavy seas and drenching rains.

The JCG said it had rescued one crew member, Sareno Edvarodo, a 45-year-old chief officer from the Philippines, on Wednesday night while searching for the ship.

According to Edvarodo, the ship lost an engine before it was hit by a wave and capsized, a coastguard spokeswoman said.

When the ship capsized, crew were instructed to put on life jackets. Edvarodo told the coastguard he jumped into the water and did not see any other crew members before he was rescued.

Pictures provided by the JCG showed a person in a life jacket being hauled from choppy seas in darkness.

Three vessels, five airplanes and two divers had been deployed to continue the search, the coastguard said.

The crew included 39 people from the Philippines, two from New Zealand and two from Australia, it added.

The Philippines government said it was coordinating with Japan’s coastguard as it searched for the missing crew members ahead of another typhoon expected to hit the area.

Typhoon Haishen was already in the northwest Pacific, tracking through the East China Sea towards South Korea.

At least one person was reported killed in South Korea after Typhoon Maysak made landfall Thursday when strong winds shattered a window in the southern city of Busan.

The Gulf Livestock 1 departed Napier in New Zealand on Aug. 14 with a cargo of 5,867 cattle bound for the Port of Jingtang in Tangshan, China. The journey was expected to take about 17 days, New Zealand’s foreign ministry told Reuters.

New Zealand animal rights organization SAFE said the tragedy demonstrated the risks of the live animal export trade.

“These cows should never have been at sea,” said campaigns manager Marianne Macdonald.

“This is a real crisis, and our thoughts are with the families of the 43 crew who are missing with the ship. But questions remain, including why this trade is allowed to continue.”

Last year, New Zealand’s government launched a review of the country’s live export trade, which was worth around NZ$54 million ($37 million) in 2019, after thousands of animals being exported from New Zealand and Australia died in transit.

A conditional ban on the live export of cattle was one of several options being considered, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor said.

To world coconut day we say: NO coconut milk today!

🥥 On this day the world celebrates one of the most healthy food, and everyone is talking about the miracle cure “Coconut Milk”…

…but we are talking about the pig monkeys, the slaves who provide your healthy milk under agonizing conditions and until the end of their life.

The monkeys are chained with metal collars before and after the coconuts are harvested and kept in isolated cages.
We remind again that this healthy food comes from illegal animal slavery predominantly in Thailand, where the pig monkey business flourishes.

The monkeys are trained to harvest as many coconuts as possible. They are supposed to harvest up to 1,000 coconuts per day.


The monkeys are chained with metal collars before and after the coconuts are harvested and kept in isolated cages.
Monkeys who fight back will have their fangs torn out. Accordingly, many animals lose their minds and hurt themselves.

Two months ago we had reported it with video, (https://worldanimalsvoice.com/2020/07/03/thailand-the-slave-monkeys-of-the-coconut-industry/#comments, but especially after the new undercover video from PETA, which shows the criminal methods of the monkey owners in “training”, we would say to Coconut day:

Stay away from coconut milk!
If you are not absolutely sure that milk will be made without tortured monkeys, then the solution is:

No coconut milk, neither today nor tomorrow.
We have the power to harm the slaveholding industry.

Boycott helps!

My best regards to all, Venus