Day: September 17, 2020

England: ‘Extinction’ – Watch the Full Video Here. A ‘Must Watch’.

Hi all;

Finally managed to get a link to a copy of ‘Extinction’ as shown by the BBC on 14/9/20.

Hoped I would; and as I originally said, it was simply a matter of time.

Hopefully this video can now be viewed by you all wherever you are located in the world.

My original article link:

https://worldanimalsvoice.com/2020/09/14/england-extinction-the-warning-to-us-all/

This version is a must watch and especially should be viewed by politicians and those in power who CAN make the changes; so if you can pass it on to any in your ‘patch’ then all the better.

It is the full 1 hour version as per the original programme.

Here is the video but I also show the link below.

Link – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yB3Jnb0e028

Please watch; get angry; get annoyed. Upset, whatever; rage and repent over what is shown, but please take the message on board – the planet needs you and all others to give a shit. 

Pass the video (or link) on to whoever you consider it worthwhile.

Thanks and Regards

Mark

Czechia: end of wild animal abuse in circuses!

+++ SUCCESS +++

The Chamber of Deputies in the Czech Parliament votes for a ban on dressage and a ban on the appearance of wild animals in circuses.
The house has just passed the end of wild animal abuse in circuses!
The ban has yet to be voted on in the House of Representatives and signed by the President, but the hardest part has already been done.

We congratulate the animal rights organization Svoboda zvířat on this success, which PETA is promoting as part of the Year of Change 2019/20. their project dealt explicitly with the ban on wild animals. ❤

 PETA Germany

And I mean…Yes, such news brings joy to our everyday life.

In the meantime, 26 EU countries have already banned or at least restricted the keeping of wild animals in traveling circuses.

We in Germany are still begging for a wild animal-free circus. Without success!

You can’t say we didn’t care, no! On the contrary – for many, many years now, numerous animal welfare organizations, private individuals, and political parties in Germany have been campaigning for such a ban to be passed here in Germany too.


But despite the long struggle, the demos, petitions … Germany obviously finds cruelty to animals in the circus as a sign of civilization.

My best regards to all, Venus

Taiwan: EU Market Access for Taiwanese Duck Eggs Spells Disaster for Animal Welfare.

Photo – ‘We Animals’ – Taiwan.

Market access for Taiwanese duck eggs spells disaster for animal welfare

14 September 2020

In December 2018, Taiwan’s Food and Drug Administration asked the European Commission to be allowed to export Taiwanese processed egg products, including duck egg products, to the EU. The application is still pending, but with the sector witnessing a move towards battery cages, Taiwanese NGOs are campaigning to raise awareness on what would be a serious step back, not only for animal welfare but also for public health.

The situation emphasises the urgent need for more stringent market access provisions in the EU, not only to prevent EU progress on animal welfare being undermined by imported products, but also to better promote higher animal welfare in third countries.

Under existing legislation, the EU does not impose any animal welfare criteria to imported eggs and egg products. While the EU has banned the use of battery cages for laying hens for more than a decade, this method of production can still be used by producers exporting to the European market, and by EU producers of other kinds of eggs. 

The case of Taiwan’s duck eggs is interesting as this is an industry that used to rely almost entirely on cage-free systems. Unfortunately, the sector has not been spared by the trend of intensification and an increasing number of water-loving ducks in Taiwan – around 20% of the 2.16 million laying ducks – are now kept in tiny barren cages, away from the water which is so essential to maintain their health, regulate their body temperature,  and keep their plumage in good conditions. 

Investigations in Taiwan have revealed ducks with wounded feet caused by the dry conditions and rusty wire floors, and animals exhibiting abnormal stereotypic behaviors resulting from life in a cage. According to the Environmental and Animal Society of Taiwan (EAST), who launched a domestic campaign on this issue, the mortality rate of ducks kept in conventional cages is two to five times higher than that of ducks kept in cage-free systems equipped with water troughs and nesting boxes, illustrating the inadequacy of cage systems.

Such intensification has also an impact on public health. The recent COVID-19 pandemic, while having emerged from wildlife, has put the spotlight on zoonosis and on the risks related to intensive farming. Intensively farmed poultry are most notable for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI), the recurrence of which is due to interaction between animals with a compromised immune system and wild animals potentially carrying low pathogenic viruses.

Over the past decade, Taiwan has faced many occurrences of HPAI, and has previously been unable to timely report the outbreaks and to address them transparently. It is often argued by the poultry sector that avian influenza is mainly spread by wild birds. However, the viruses carried by wild birds are usually of low pathogenicity and it is only when these viruses reach overcrowded sheds that they can evolve into a more dangerous form of avian influenza (1). 

Humans can be contaminated by zoonotic influenza, whether they originate from birds or pigs. The previous pandemic, the H1N1 outbreak in Mexico, killed between 151,00 and 575,000 people worldwide, 80% of which were under 65 year old. It is thus important to favour systems that will be more resilient to such diseases, and the European Commission should consider this aspect when assessing Taiwan’s bid to export duck egg products into the EU. 

A record-breaking 1.5 million EU citizens have called for a ban on cages in the EU, demonstrating the strength of public opinion on this issue.

As the EU considers moves to strengthen domestic regulations, it should not repeat past mistakes by leaving the door open to low-welfare imports. Any ban on cages should thus become a requirement for those exporting to the EU, including Taiwanese duck egg producers. 

With the review of animal welfare legislation foreseen in the EU Farm-to-Fork strategy, the external dimension of our rules cannot remain overlooked. As the European Commission concluded itself, imposing EU standards to imported goods (as with the slaughter regulation) is the EU’s best tool to promote higher welfare abroad.

(1) Nickbakhsh, S. et al., 2016, Modelling the impact of co-circulating low pathogenic avian influenza viruses on epidemics of highly pathogenic avian influenza in poultry, Epidemics, 17:27-34

Italy: Activists protest against intensive fish farming conditions.

WAV Comment: Well done them – very effective. Fish too need a voice !

Activists protest against intensive fish farming conditions in Italy

17 September 2020

Essere Animali

On board of a motorised boat, activists from our Italian member Essere Animali reached a fish farm in the province of La Spezia, Italy. Arriving near the cages in the sea where hundreds of thousands of fish are confined, they unrolled a banner to protest against the poor living conditions of these animals, destined for the large-scale distribution market.

“Caged in the open sea – “FishToo need to be protected” reads the thirty square meter banner captured by the drone that the activists used for the shooting. The fish farm where the protest took place, is specialised in the breeding of sea bass and sea bream, and has about thirty cages located along the coast of the Ligurian province. The fish spend around 16 to 22 months for the fattening process in these cramped cages in the sea until they reach the commercial weight of 300 to 500g. 

https://www.youtube.com/embed/fxwEqRVg3bg?autoplay=0&start=0&rel=0&enablejsapi=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.eurogroupforanimals.org “Crammed into cages, tanks, or ponds, these animals live in conditions that do not allow them to express their natural behaviour. Their life is of deprivation, spent in unhealthy environments with very high densities where they are often fed with antibiotics to contain the inevitable spread of viruses and bacteria”, says Brenda Ferretti, Outreach Manager of Essere Animali. “Furthermore, compared to terrestrial animals, fish raised for food spend much more time on the farm, and at the time of the killing, they are victims of atrocious suffering. But fish are also sentient beings, capable of feeling fear and pain, and therefore worthy of being defended and protected”.

Essere Animali underlines the urgent need for a change in the critical conditions which fish are enduring in the aquaculture industry, the food sector with the highest growth rate in recent decades. According to the new FAO report “The State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture” (SOFIA), aquaculture production now represents 52% of fish destined for human consumption. This means that half of the fish that reaches consumers’ tables comes from fish farms, where the predominant production model is industrial and intensive.

“Although fish are the animals raised in the greatest number in the food industry, they are also the least protected by national and EU legislation. This, combined with harmful breeding practices, such as the absence of effective stunning procedures which could reduce their suffering at the time of slaughter, pushes up to stand up for the protection of these animals”, continues Brenda Ferretti.

In this problematic context, the role of large-scale distribution is decisive. In fact, according to the Italian Institute of Services for the Agricultural Food Market (ISMEA), about 80% of purchases of fresh fish and processed fish products in Italy take place in modern distribution outlets. With its purchasing power, large-scale distribution can encourage farming practices that are more respectful of the life of the fish raised in their fish supply chains, binding its suppliers to adhere to stricter production standards. As part of their campaign #AncheiPesci (“#FishToo”), Essere Animali is, therefore, collecting signatures for a petition calling for better welfare conditions for farmed fish.

“Crammed into cages, tanks, or ponds, these animals live in conditions that do not allow them to express their natural behaviour. Their life is of deprivation, spent in unhealthy environments with very high densities where they are often fed with antibiotics to contain the inevitable spread of viruses and bacteria”, says Brenda Ferretti, Outreach Manager of Essere Animali. “Furthermore, compared to terrestrial animals, fish raised for food spend much more time on the farm, and at the time of the killing, they are victims of atrocious suffering. But fish are also sentient beings, capable of feeling fear and pain, and therefore worthy of being defended and protected”.

Essere Animali underlines the urgent need for a change in the critical conditions which fish are enduring in the aquaculture industry, the food sector with the highest growth rate in recent decades. According to the new FAO report “The State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture” (SOFIA), aquaculture production now represents 52% of fish destined for human consumption. This means that half of the fish that reaches consumers’ tables comes from fish farms, where the predominant production model is industrial and intensive.

“Although fish are the animals raised in the greatest number in the food industry, they are also the least protected by national and EU legislation. This, combined with harmful breeding practices, such as the absence of effective stunning procedures which could reduce their suffering at the time of slaughter, pushes up to stand up for the protection of these animals”, continues Brenda Ferretti.

In this problematic context, the role of large-scale distribution is decisive. In fact, according to the Italian Institute of Services for the Agricultural Food Market (ISMEA), about 80% of purchases of fresh fish and processed fish products in Italy take place in modern distribution outlets. With its purchasing power, large-scale distribution can encourage farming practices that are more respectful of the life of the fish raised in their fish supply chains, binding its suppliers to adhere to stricter production standards. As part of their campaign #AncheiPesci (“#FishToo”), Essere Animali is, therefore, collecting signatures for a petition calling for better welfare conditions for farmed fish.

Read more at source

Essere Animali

Pro-Vegan TV Ad Goes Viral In Israel.

WATCH: Pro-Vegan TV Ad Goes Viral In Israel

‘After so many years seeing commercials for animal products, it is exciting to see a vegan commercial that talks about compassion for animals’

PLANT BASED NEWS

SEP 16, 2020

The advert shows a couple 'making the connection' (Photo: Supplied to Plant Based News)

The advert shows a couple ‘making the connection’ (Photo: Supplied to Plant Based News)

A pro-vegan T.V ad – Israel’s first – has reached 35 percent of the nation, after being broadcast during one of the country’s most popular T.V shows – and has earned positive feedback with viewers branding it ‘effective’.

The 60-second advert, created by international non-profit Vegan Friendly, shows a couple shopping in a supermarket. When they ask for ‘extra fresh’ meat, they are handed a living lamb. The commercial ends with the message ‘make the connection’.

Millions of viewers

The advert was initially broadcast during the current season finale of Survivor Israel: this season has the highest ratings in the show’s history, and so the spot was chosen to ensure as many people as possible would see the commercial.

According to Vegan Friendly, a massive 35 percent of the country’s population – some 3 million people – watched the ad.

The organization’s founder and CEO Omri Paz told Plant Based News: “After so many years seeing commercials of animal products, it is exciting to see for a change a vegan commercial that talks about compassion for animals on the most popular show in the country.”

Positive feedback

The advert is now also available to watch on YouTube, where it has garnered praise. One viewer wrote: “Yes! Who could ever hurt that sweet innocent lamb! Not me! Not anyone who could see it and hold it. Make the connection! Go vegan!”

Another was inspired to share their transition to veganism, writing: “This is excellent. My own story is that I worked in a meat dept. for three years prior to ‘making the connection’. There was no slaughtering there. I never would have been able to do that, but still, I was one step more involved than just buying and consuming animal foods. I think my soul is quite curious and wanted to see what this experience was like while it still could. I came out of ignorance and switched to veganism just four months after quitting the job.”

One simply said: “This is spot on! Way to go veganism, people are so blind to make a connection to life! Definitely, this will make everyone rethink.”

Dubious deals again: EU Commission and European Chemicals Agency

The Board of Appeal of the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) recently published two decisions on animal testing for cosmetics.

It stipulates that ingredients that are used exclusively for cosmetics may still be tested on animals under the REACH regulation. (Registration, Evaluation, Authorization, and Restriction of Chemicals)
In fact, animal testing for cosmetic ingredients has been banned since the EU Cosmetics Regulation came into force in 2013 – and thus the current decisions represent an absolute misinterpretation of the law, as they enable manufacturers and regulatory authorities to effectively ignore the ban.

What does all this mean for animals and what can we do about it?

The following will happen to the animals:
As a direct result of the decisions, over 5,500 rats, rabbits, and fish are used in new experiments.
Some of them are given a cosmetic ingredient repeatedly during pregnancy.
The animals themselves and their offspring are then killed and dissected.

Maus Tierversuche

In addition, the decisions open the door to further animal testing, as hundreds of new cosmetic products come onto the market every year, the ingredients of which may then have to be tested on animals within the framework of REACH – at the expense of tens of thousands of animals.

Continue reading “Dubious deals again: EU Commission and European Chemicals Agency”