England: Geronimo, Serbian Strays and Badgers. All Policy Victims Of Governments That Will Not Accept The Evidence.

The question about biosecurity on farms is one area that a great deal of people, especially in government and farming; want to veer away from.

But here we will show you the compensation payouts which are given:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/bovine-tb-historical-compensation-value-tables/august-2021

Going back to badgers, the scientific evidence demonstrates that culling of badgers is likely to be ineffective in fighting the disease and, worse still, risks making the problem even worse. Campaigners believe the emphasis of every persons efforts should be to find a long-term solution, and thus, we are calling for the Government to end its policy of culling badgers immediately

We personally have had lots of experience fighting a government in Serbia that sees the unlawful killing of stray dogs as the ‘only’ option to big stray numbers.  We argue that, rather than wasting endless money killing, instead, invest the money spent into a worthwhile sterilisation strategy for the long term reduction of stray animal numbers.  The mass murder of badgers in the UK has a lot of similarities with the mass murder of stray dogs in Serbia.  One thing is for sure, in both nations, governments will not act on the evidence given, and innocent animals suffer as a result.

For example, killing the vast majority of stray dogs in any region of Serbia under government instruction, for all purposes, initially seems the way to go. Everything appears perfect for a week or so, and there are initially less dogs roaming the streets.  The result, a delighted ‘told you so’ government, claiming their kill policy is working.  But wait, killing most, if not all the strays, then opens a void in that particular ‘kill’ region which directly attracts stray dogs from other regions outside

They, outside region dogs, see the potential for more food, for example, if they move in.  These ‘new’ exterior visitors may be harboring diseases which do not currently exist in the ‘kill’ region.  Within weeks, due to non sterlisation undertakings, stray numbers are back to what they were before the cull, and now regional authorities in which the cull took place are additionally blessed with extra diseases, for which, they may have to now compensate the public if they happen too be bitten (by a rabid dog) for example.

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