Sea Shepherd and “Whales Forever”

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In March 1994, Sea Shepherd acquired the British ship SWITZER MERCATOR and renamed it WHALES FOREVER. The ship was brought directly to the Netherlands to be repaired and refitted.

WHALES FOREVER became the target of two arson attacks during its short but turbulent time at Sea Shepherd. While the first attack did little damage, the second act of sabotage triggered a fire and explosion in the engine room. Due to the extensive repairs, it took a month longer to get the ship going again.

The WHALES FOREVER subsequently left the Netherlands and opposed illegal whaling on the coast of Northern Norway, which triggered widespread coverage in the European media.

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The Norwegian Navy ship ANDENES intercepted the WHALES FOREVER and tried several times to damage its propeller, but Captain Watson was able to maneuver the ANDENES over and over again.

Frustrated, the ANDENES captain misjudged his next approach and rammed the Sea Shepherd ship. The impact smashed the bow of the WHALES FOREVER and tore a leak into a gas tank, spilling hundreds of gallons of fuel on the deck and soaking three crew members.
During the collision, the propeller was also blocked by a rope that the ANDENES pulled behind it.

The WHALES FOREVER team reacted quickly to remove the gasoline and thus avoid the risk of an explosion. At the same time, Sea Shepherd divers went into the water and cut the rope from the screw.

Although the ANDENES fired two cannons at the WHALES FOREVER and detonated four water bombs in front of its hull, the WHALES FOREVER managed to prevent the Norwegian Navy from boarding and to return to the Scottish Shetland Islands.

When the damaged ship was brought to dry dock in Bremerhaven, it turned out that the water bombs had caused massive damage.

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In October 1994 the WHALES FOREVER set off for Florida, where Captain Watson sold the ship a few months later. He ended up getting more money for the ship than he originally paid for it.

In less than 12 months, WHALES FOREVER had managed to make a name for itself in the media and repeatedly drew public attention to illegal whaling in Norway.

Photo: © Sea Shepherd

 

My comment: Every year the same! The hunting season in Norway started again on April 1st.

Norway hunts for whales in large quantities, although the meat is not more popular.
Norway sets the quotas itself and also slaughters significant quantities of female minke whales.

The quota is so high that Norway kills more whales than Japan and Iceland combined. Since 1993, around 12,000 whales have been killed (“officially”).

A very large proportion of the females are pregnant, so the rate is much higher than officially stated.

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The whales will have to suffer for a long time when they go whaling. The agony can last from a few minutes to 2 hours.

The victim tries to escape with the harpoon in her body and loses a lot of blood and is in great pain. A whale is often fired at the whale’s head several times and some animals are still alive when they are brought on board and only then are they killed.

Norway has long known that whaling is no longer worthwhile for its own country, and yet they are sticking to whaling. The question is why this is so.

They have been trying to export whale meat to Japan for several years, but Japan`s stocks are also overcrowded with whale meat.
The prices are sometimes in the basement and the Norwegian fishermen even pay extra.

In addition, the government has paid the equivalent of 2.4 million euros to the whaling industry since the 1990s. It is therefore clear that slaughtering whales is not worthwhile.

And so the question of WHY remains unanswered.

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The hunters of Germany also cannot provide a logical answer for the annual mass murder of 600,000 foxes or 96,000 wild boars.
There is no logical reason for hunting on the 21st century.

It is driven by psychopaths and is simply a secondary form of mental illness.

My best regards to all, Venus

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