Fox hunting : organized animal cruelty

As a leisure activity, hunters across Germany kill up to half a million foxes in the cruelest way every year – many of the animals are “only” shot or downright crushed and mutilated in traps.

Foxes are a living target for hunters; there is no reason for the massive hunting of predators, neither from a wildlife biological nor from a health point of view. Politics must finally act and put an end to the senseless killing of useful animals.

Pain and suffering – what hunting means to wild animals. Shot … and dead!

Fox with stomach injuries-Image: pelli

In many cases, this is not the case. Studies in Great Britain have shown this, among other things. The accuracy is poor, every second fox is only wounded by a gunshot wound but not dead. Two-thirds of wild boars were shot dead after a driven hunt: in the back, in the stomach, or in the legs. Approx. 60% of the female animals in the deer were shot in the stomach.

According to the Veterinary Association for Animal Welfare, up to 70 percent of wild animals do not die immediately, especially during driven hunts, but rather suffer excruciating jaw, stomach, and barrel shots.

Lower jaw shot away: This young wild boar starved and died of thirst

Most foxes are hunted during the winter months. The snow makes hunting easier and the otherwise vigilant animals are careless because now is the mating season for foxes. For many fox pups who see the light of day from March, this means that they will grow up without the fox father. But it has a very important function in their rearing due to the procurement of food.

As a result, the young foxes are often physically weakened, their ability to survive is much lower than that of fox pups that were raised with a provider.

Little is known to the public that trapping is still allowed in Germany.
Both manslaughter traps and live traps can cause extreme animal suffering.
Most of the animals try to get the bait out with their paws. Then the safety stirrup slams shut and the leg is crushed.
Many foxes and cats will pull at it until they can escape with limbs half severed.
Fox mothers, who know their young are hungry in the burrow, even bite off their paws to escape.

Numerous studies now show that fox hunting does not “regulate” the fox population, nor does it contain wild diseases (e.g. distemper, mange, fox tapeworm), or makes a meaningful, sustainable contribution to the preservation of threatened species. Fox populations regulate themselves based on social fabric, food availability, and disease.

Fox hunting is prohibited in Luxembourg and other countries and regions – there are no problems with overpopulation there.

Please sign the Petition: https://www.peta.de/kampagnen/fuchsjagd-stoppen/

And I mean…Every year in January and February foxes are hunted even more intensely and ruthlessly in Germany than they already are.

The so-called “fox weeks” are held right in the middle of the mating season – now even a whole fox month, preferably during the full moon weeks in January and February.

During a defined period of time, as many hunters as possible take part, often across territories, to shot on the fox. As a result, the “loden jackets” enjoy (!) a few dozen dead foxes.

In almost every place cross-territory fox hunts are organized, to which territorial hunters and young hunters are invited in order to kill as many foxes as possible. After the hunt, the animals are lined up in a line and the killings are celebrated by the hunters.

According to Section 17 of the Animal Welfare Act, it is forbidden to kill or harm an animal without good cause.
Nothing else happens when hunting foxes.
Animal protection has been anchored in the Basic Law since 2002 and is to be regarded as a binding asset with constitutional status.
The state protection goal of “animal protection” has the status of a fundamental right – but not hunting.

Thus the hunting law is subordinate to animal welfare.

Unfortunately, the hunter’s lobby is well networked in government circles and politics. In Luxembourg, on the other hand, the government was not impressed by the lies and slogans of the hunters and in April 2015 enforced a fox hunting ban that continues to this day.

The result: “No major problems”. The Luxembourg hunting association “Fédération Saint-Hubert” nevertheless tried to take legal action against the hunting ban – without success.

In 2016, the administrative court upheld the ban on fox hunting and the hunters’ flimsy arguments were clearly dismissed by the judge.

Hunting in Germany is an unlawful area.
According to their own statements, 380,000 hunters kill around 5 million wild animals in Germany every year.

The truth probably looks even worse: Wildtierschutz Deutschland e.V. estimates that a total of over 9 million animals are killed by hunting in Germany every year.

The hunters carry out these executions with legal government assistance.
“Hunters and the state go hand-to-hand in the forest”, where the murderers, heavily armed to the teeth, kill defenseless animals

A civilized country is not understood as such if it brutally massacres 500,000 foxes annually and proudly presents itself in the media as a potent -execution- gang.

A civilized country is understood as such when it feels and practices respect, compassion, and protection for every species of animal.

And it is therefore a shame for our society, by silence and passivity to give a minority of 0.45% the right to decide about life and death to defenseless animals.

My best regards to all, Venus

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